Greenwood Dentist

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Greenwood Dentist
Greenwood Dentist offers Dentists services in Greenwood IN.

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El Salvador 2017 - Last words, 3-18-17 fb.me/144Iz7HH3

Harty and Wilson DDS published a note.
El Salvador 2017 - Last words, 3-18-17
Hey to all, I write form the Houston Airport where we have a 6 hour layover. The conversation is light and easy as we are chilling since we have been up since 315 to get to the airport, go through security, and then go through it again at the gate – they look at everything you are carrying on, which if you have traveled with me, you know how long that is going to take. Also they never like all of the medications I have and question them. I have been known to lift my shirt up to show them my abdominal scar, and that usually shuts down any questions. Yesterday was our rest day, so we went to the Volcano Santa Ana, which is at 7850 ft. It is a beautiful, and moderate hike and takes a little over an hour. But from the summit you can see the ocean, into Guatemala and down to Nicaragua, and the mountains that are extinct volcanos, and even a few live ones, although the there is too much dust to see if the erupting ones except at night. We are escorted by the Tourismo Police who go everywhere with us, and they even walked up with us. They told us they do it a couple of times a week, and they seemed to be enjoying themselves. I think we are pretty easy and we were not in any physical distress, so they had an easy day of it. In honor of St Patrick’s Day, I was presented with little bunnies to wear - the Dollar Store (and it is literally a US Dollar that the economy runs on and where all of the Sacagawea dollar coins have gone) had no Irish or St Patrick stuff so they went with the next closest holiday. Today I was presented with a bag of Gomiocas Dientes (Gummy Teeth) from the same store – they could not pass up the opportunity. Last words This has been a really good week, mostly because Tom, Robin, Anthony, Jessica and Tim are very easy to travel with and we have been around the horn a few times and go with the flow. About everything that was set up for our clinics before hand went to pot, but that is what happens on these trips – the best laid plans change in a heartbeat. Janet who had it all set up several months ago did a great job of rearranging the clinics with 2 days notice, and I am not telling you 10% of what all she does. But we learned a lot about how we need to proceed in El Salvador from here on out. We are determined to continue working here as there is incredible poverty, and people have nobody they can depend on. We will adjust our plan and continue to treat those who need it most. The patients that we saw, treated and took care of were unbelievably grateful and were desperate for care. The house building project was great fun. There is something about using our hands in a different way to help someone that is satisfying – especially since we completed it in one day as well. I am still a little sore today. That is why it was fun to do it at the end of the clinics because I could throw myself into it, rather than hold back to protect myself for clinics. By the end of each day, my back, arm, neck and right leg always hurt and are worn out, and do not want to start out already sore (I just don’t recover like I did when I was younger). And the truth is, I just love Tom, Robin and Anthony – we are like minded on almost everything, and they teach me every time I am with them what love looks like in the practice of medicine, but also in how the love others and each other. It is beautiful to see them in action. Jessica and Tim were great and easy additions and I would travel with those two anywhere. Lastly, the flowers on the corner will always remind me of when I received the news about my sweet Shane. She was as brilliant and bright as the colors of those flowers, and my life is better for working with her and being loved by her. I will remember those who walked by and were concerned, even though we did not speak the same language, and hugged me when I needed it most. And at the end of the day, I think that is what keeps me doing these trips. The love shared, given, accepted and absorbed by all of us throughout our existence. Until the fall, Doug



El Salvador 2017 last day of clinics 3-15-17 fb.me/2RmkvrooU

Harty and Wilson DDS published a note.
El Salvador 2017 last day of clinics 3-15-17
Hola, I write from the confines of my hotel room, trying to stay awake, so I would ask for grace in tonight’s writings. We just finished dinner with two dentists that we met when they were students. One of who was nearly electrocuted during dental school while providing care for the poor at one of the dental brigades the dentals school. It was a minor miracle he was not killed, but the electricity exited his toes, which required plastic surgery as a result. The other has become a good friend and we were glad to have them join us for dinner and they wish to help with clinics next year – just great guys. A couple of house keeping notes: 1. When I wrote of the marching band playing for us last as we left the clinic site yesterday I failed to mention how proud they were to play for us. And every one of them shook our hands and said, “Thank you for coming and God bless you.” It was their gift to us, and was the best thing they had that they could give us to show their appreciation. Their horns were beyond used, and not highly polished, but they sounded great and played for all they were worth. I was too tired to express this last night, but it was truly magnificent and we were all quite touched. 2. Also, people have been asking about our security. It has been wonderful and we have not worried one iota about it. Where we were at the last couple of days, we did not venture out, but today we walked for coffee twice, and it was great to get out. 3. I have heard from a few wanting clarification about what I wrote about if we were doing any good. The answer is absolutely, and we have treated several approaching 1000 people in three days. I was really busy until today, but still saw about 10 patients. My point in writing what I did was that in a global sense, I don’t worry about changing the world. In an intimate sense, I am working one person at a time trying to improve their health – physical, emotional and spiritual. Today We drove about 10 minutes to a school near out hotel. Immediately around out hotel there is 2 or 3 malls, and between the 4 or 6 lane roads surrounding the malls are vast squatter camps of very impoverished areas. I really want to work in them, but logistically, it is better to work from a school. I really like this place, especially because the kids are in school while we work and it is nuts when the bell sounds between classes (I am kind of addicted to chaos). When we arrived it took a while to get things going, but I saw about 10 patients, and at the end the Tom, Robin and Jessica had run out of antibiotics and Albendazole, which is a parasitic worm medication – if we do nothing else, we deworm everyone. It may only be for 3 weeks, but it is one thing we do that matters huge in the health of the impoverished. At the end they were only had Tylenol and Advil, so Robin closed the clinic. I followed their lead and was done by 3. Nothing too crazy for me, although I needed one of the Salvadoran docs to help me out with a molar that I was trying to get out of a space for a tooth half that size. I was grateful he got it out for me (and her). Also my first patient was a 13 yo that needed two teeth removed. The mother was talking the entire time and I finally had to shush her so her son would pay attention to me, and feel my rhythm. The translator told me she was telling me how to do everything, but he chose not to translate because he thought I might get upset. I told him this is the way it is at my office in The States every day. He laughed and told her and she came over and punched me in the shoulder as she laughed as well, and a little embarrassed. Like I said, just like my office… At lunch we went out for a coffee run (this after always starting the morning out with venti latte from Starbucks across the street from out hotel. We found a place with really dense cappuccino. Then after we ended clinics, and loaded our supplies onto the van to take back to the hotel, we walked in search of the same coffee shop that we go to every year that roasts their own coffee. Alas it had closed. After walking around and asking, we were led to The 4 Monkeys Café and Roaster. WE went upstairs to a place that had a view that was to kill for of the volcano through a flowering tree and it was breezy and beautiful. I could have slept there it was so gorgeous (and had coffee). Pictures will follow, or look on Facebook or Instagram for me. Tomorrow we are going to help construct a house. Because our clinic week is over, I do not care about my back or neck or arms or anything else – if it were before we had clinics, I would be bailing out so as not to be too sore to work in clinics. We are really looking forward to it. Anyway, I am about to drop. More tomorrow



El Salvador 2017 #3 Second day of clinics 3-14-17 fb.me/4BXNVTNwa

Harty and Wilson DDS published a note.
El Salvador 2017 #3 Second day of clinics 3-14-17
Hey kids, As I went to pray for this sweet little old lady, I placed my left hand on her right shoulder, and my right hand on her right hand above her elbow as I closed my eyes. To touch someone is healing in it’s own right. I always have my hands on people as I work and pray to physically connect and also comfort them. She placed her hand over my hand on her arm. When I finished praying, she took my hand she had been covering and removed it from her right breast. She had a slight grin as I was melting onto the concrete floor, I think as not to embarrass me even more. I can imagine the conversation with her friends when she got home. The school we have worked at the last two days, intentionally bring in people from two different areas for us to treat. That is to keep the gangs from those areas separate. They say these areas have “dormitory homes.” That is, a single mother gets up well before dawn, goes to work in a sweat shop and comes home at 7 or 8 pm and just to bed to sleep so she can get up and do it again. She has no choice but to leave her kids to fend for themselves during the day and that is when the gangs come into play. They lurk in the shadows looking for those who want to belong to something. If you don’t have a family, you will look for something that looks like family to fulfill what is missing. And if you don’t join, they kill you. That is what I was alluding to in last nights email about the lady who lost the young child. I heard more of those prayer requests today, and it is heart breaking, but that is real life. When we left after our day was over, they marching band played for us, to thank us for coming and it was spectacular. It was a little surreal, but really beautiful and my heart appreciated it. As I said last night there is a huge shortage of medicine and supplies through out the country. We asked someone if he thought what we were doing was making a difference, as we are concerned with follow up care to some of the conditions being treated. He told us how you know when you are living in a poor country in two simple ways. Your children go to a school and they have a teacher, but they do not have books, the roof if they have one leaks, they have nothing to write with, and etc. Second, you get sick, you go to the hospital and to have treatment it costs 5 times what you make in a month, and they don’t even have the supplies to do the treatment. So his answer was that we could not fully understand the effect of what we were doing. It didn’t exactly make us feel better, but it did to know it helped. At the end of the day it is about giving people Hope. I write from my hotel room after clinic today, followed by a massage then dinner at the Argentine Steak House (for those who have been with us in the past), and ice cream. I felt I earned all of it (well, except for the above, but even that was a bit of a traumatic embarrassment). I saw 20 some patients today, got a ton of teeth, and it was 89º at the worst of it, although I sweat through, it didn’t feel that hot. Yesterday, every tooth came out nicely, and I told the two high school students we would pay for that today, and I did. I worked on a 17 yo male that needed his first molar out and the roots must have been going away from each other as I could not get it out, and ended up snapping the crown of the tooth off to hopefully get to the roots that had separated in the fracture. No such luck, and my arm was shot after an hour of trying. It did not even dawn on me that there were 4 other Salvador docs with me, so one of them got it out after another 4 minutes. The kid was so grateful it was really cute, but I figure by about now he is not so grateful. Had several other tough ones but they eventually came out. Tom and Robin had 5 medical students with them today so they were able to see a bunch of patients, but I was so busy, I really didn’t much of a chance to see them. Jessica went with Anthony to the hospital and they did a C-section, and had a spontaneous vaginal delivery of a 22 week old that survived the delivery, but they suspected was less than 500 gms and was not viable. I'm not trying to be all clinical, but this is the way it works and this is what Anthony faces each day. I love Tom, Robin and Anthony, to watch them work, talk about cases and see their hearts through their works and deeds. Finally, and not exactly sure where this is coming from, but I was asked this morning from one of you if what we do makes a difference in any of the countries we work. It was asked in a purely innocent and non judgemental way. And the truth is, I don’t know. But here is what I do know. For the person that is standing, sitting or laying in front of me, I am doing my best to make them feel like someone loved on them as hard as he could for a little while. For a few minutes, they are listened to respectfully, and given the best treatment that I can provide. I touch, hold and cry with them, I ask how I can pray for them, and I sincerely want to spend time hearing them, that I try to give them Hope. Does it make the country, area, city, or neighborhood better? I don’t know and don't really care. But for that person, I have to believe that it does made a difference. Love matters. It always will. That's why He died, to show that Love is stronger, matters more, one person at a time. I am dead tired, and hoping this makes a little sense to you. More tomorrow, Doug


El Salvador 2017 #2 First day of clinics, 3-13-17 fb.me/8fKsVy7UW


El Salvador 2017 #1 3-12-17 fb.me/2M3yEHFsX