Excel Electrical Services

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Excel Electrical Services
Excel Electrical Services is listed in the Electricians category in Reynoldsburg, Ohio. Displayed below are the social networks for Excel Electrical Services which include a Facebook page, a Google Plus page and a Yelp review page. The activity and popularity of Excel Electrical Services on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 78.

Excel Electrical Services offers Electrician services in Reynoldsburg OH.

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Fixing many of the minor electrical issues before you list your home can reduce some big headaches later. Most home inspectors are not electricians and they have a limited knowledge of the local electrical codes. They write up an electrical inspection report with several “electrical problems”. Then, the buyer wants all the electrical hazards fixed or a large cash allowance (lower purchase price) to have them repaired later. Common Items on the “Buyer’s Request to Remedy” Include: Installing GFI outlets in your bathrooms, within 6 feet of your kitchen sink. Installing GFI outlets in your garage, unfinished basements, and out doors are sometimes included. Check with your local building department or electrical contractor to see if the above items are really required. They might have a “grandfathered” exception clause (please install GFCI outlets near any sink or other wet location). Test for properly installed 3- prong receptacles. Many homes built before 1965 only have two wires going to the outlets. Many times over the years, people replaced the old 2-prong outlets with newer 3-prong outlets. They test as an open ground or non-grounded outlet. This can result in the buyer wanting the entire house rewired. Have the electrician fix this item before it’s a deal killer. The main electrical panel problems include: Double tapped wires on breakers. GFI outlets not installed by the bathroom and kitchen sinks. Open grounds or non grounded electrical receptacles. Reversed polarity outlets. Missing wire connectors. Open junction boxes & missing electrical covers. Oversized breakers or wrong sized wires. Frayed service entrance cables or wires. Electrical panel has water damage or rust inside it.Fixing many of the minor electrical issues before you list your home can reduce some big headaches later. Most home inspectors are not electricians and they have a limited knowledge of the local electrical codes. They write up an electrical inspection report with several “electrical problems”. Then, the buyer wants all the electrical hazards fixed or a large cash allowance (lower purchase price) to have them repaired later. Common Items on the “Buyer’s Request to Remedy” Include: Installing GFI outlets in your bathrooms, within 6 feet of your kitchen sink. Installing GFI outlets in your garage, unfinished basements, and out doors are sometimes included. Check with your local building department or electrical contractor to see if the above items are really required. They might have a “grandfathered” exception clause (please install GFCI outlets near any sink or other wet location). Test for properly installed 3- prong receptacles. Many homes built before 1965 only have two wires going to the outlets. Many times over the years, people replaced the old 2-prong outlets with newer 3-prong outlets. They test as an open ground or non-grounded outlet. This can result in the buyer wanting the entire house rewired. Have the electrician fix this item before it’s a deal killer. The main electrical panel problems include: Double tapped wires on breakers. GFI outlets not installed by the bathroom and kitchen sinks. Open grounds or non grounded electrical receptacles. Reversed polarity outlets. Missing wire connectors. Open junction boxes & missing electrical covers. Oversized breakers or wrong sized wires. Frayed service entrance cables or wires. Electrical panel has water damage or rust inside it. Excel Electrical Services llc 614 863-0588

Why Does the Hair Dryer Trip Circuit Breaker? A very common service call is that the fuse blows or the circuit breaker trips when they use their hair dryer. So why does the hair dryer cause a short in the wire or other power problem? Hair dryers of early '70's were only 750 watts (about 6 amps). Then in the '80's they started upgraded them to 1000 watts (8 amps), 1250 watts (10 amps) and then 1500 watts (12 amps).In the mid '90's they got even more powerful with 1875 watts (15 amp). Most homes built before the late 1990's only of have a 15 amp power circuit feeding the lights and outlets in several bedrooms and the bathroom. The newer hair dryers are rated at 1875 watts at 125 volt which equal 15 amps of current draw. The newer 15 amp hair dryer simply maxed out the existing 15 amp circuit wiring. The fuse or circuit breaker was sized to protect the wiring from an electrical overload and / or possible fire hazard. Solutions to Breaker Tripping There are several solutions to your circuit tripping when using your blow dryer. One is getting a smaller wattage hair dryer to draw less power. Turning off all the other electrical loads and lights on the that circuit when drying your hair is another solution. If these free solutions do not work you can have the electrician wire a new 20 amp circuit to the area that is used to style hair. You can not install a bigger fuse or breaker on the 15 amp wiring as it may result in a electrical fire hazard. Many homes built after 2000 have a 20 amp circuit supplying power for the bathroom outlets to reduce the hair dryer over load problem. The solutions listed should solve the overloading of the bathroom outlet circuit for using one item. However, you will still only be able to use your 1875 watt hairdryer and1875 watt curling iron one at a time.

No power in half of the house is regular service call request. Two of the more common causes includes, the a failure on the electric power company's' line to your property or a breaker malfunction. Okay here is a quick first lesson in electricity. The average home has a 120/240 volt main electric service. There are 3 wires from the electric power company to your home, 2 live wires and 1 neutral wire. The 2 live wires we will name phase "A" and Phase "B". Phase "A" to the neutral is 120 volts. Phase "B" to the neutral is 120 volts also. The two 120 volt wires powers' all your general lights and receptacles around the house. So if one phase wire stops working half of the house will have no power and the electrician will call it “losing a phase”. Lesson 2 is about 240 volt part of your electrical system. Phase "A" to Phase "B" is 240 volts. The 240 volts system normally powers things such as your electric stove, hot water heater, clothes dyer, air conditioner and furnace. So if you “lose a phase” these appliances will not work properly since they may only have 120 volts being supplied to them. You have about a 50/50 shot between calling the power company or an electrician regarding your power outage. If it’s the power company wire problem they may fix it for free. If it’s not a utility company issue then you will have to call the electrician. Causes for this may include a faulty main breaker or a loose connection in the meter can, main breaker, main electric buss or a bad feeder wire. Loose connections resulting in overheated parts will require replacement of the faulty part(s), wire(s) or the entire electric box itself. Unfortunately, all these repairs are expensive. Sometime a single circuit breaker or fuse being off will be mistaken for half the power is out. So check your main electric box for a tripped breaker of blown fuse first.

Excel Electrical Services shared Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI)'s photo.
https://www.facebook.com/ESFI.org/photos/a.250613468309645.55706.244172605620398/1212476555456660/?type=3
Do you know how to tell if your homes electrical system is overloaded? 47,700 home fires in the U.S. are caused by electrical failures or malfunctions each year. These fires result in 418 deaths, 1,570 injuries, and $1.4 billion in property damage.

Part of the electric plug decided stay in the wall receptacle after the plug was removed. Bare metal piece sticking out was an electrocution hazard.