Bouldersmiles

91
Bouldersmiles
Bouldersmiles is listed in the Dentists category in Boulder, Colorado. Displayed below are the social networks for Bouldersmiles which include a Facebook page and a Google Plus page. The activity and popularity of Bouldersmiles on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 91.

Bouldersmiles offers Dentists services in Boulder CO.

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91
Bouldersmiles has an overall ZapScore of 91. This means that Bouldersmiles has a higher ZapScore than 91% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Boulder, Colorado is 41 and in the category is 25. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Having your teeth professionally cleaned every 3- 4 months is important for patients with diabetes. Contact us at bouldersmiles to keep your gums and bone as healthy as possible Patients with type 2 diabetes more likely to develop periodontitis By Tony Edwards, editor in chief June 22, 2017 -- Periodontal disease is a major complication of diabetes mellitus. But is a patient with type 2 diabetes more likely to develop periodontal disease than a patient with type 1 diabetes? A study presented at the recent American Diabetes Association's annual meeting tried to answer this important question. As these types of diabetes develop quite differently, understanding possible differences in the clinical variables of the two conditions may help prevent and manage periodontal disease in these patients. The researchers found that patients with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have periodontitis and gingivitis than patients with type 1 diabetes. "Periodontal disease prevalence was higher in patients with type 2 diabetes, and it is associated with age progression, duration of disease, and poor glycemic control, regardless of the type of diabetes," the study authors wrote. The study was led by Marcello Gaieta Vannucci, DDS, a dental surgeon in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Age also a factor Periodontal disease involves a complex interplay between oral bacteria and a patient's response to that bacteria. Systemic conditions such as diabetes mellitus also can affect a patient's periodontium. Periodontal disease is the sixth most frequent chronic complication of diabetes mellitus, the study authors noted. “Periodontal disease prevalence was higher in patients with type 2 diabetes, and it is associated with age progression, duration of disease, and poor glycemic control.” — Marcello Gaieta Vannucci, DDS, and colleagues However, as the mechanisms that lead to the development of the diabetes types are different, the researchers sought to discover if patients with type 1 diabetes or those with type 2 diabetes were more likely to have periodontal disease. Their study included almost 290 patients: 102 patients with type 1 diabetes, 103 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 83 patients without diabetes in the control group. The patients were screened for periodontal disease according to the recommendations of the American Academy of Periodontology and the ADA. The study excluded patients who had periodontal treatment in the previous six months. The patients with type 1 diabetes were generally younger than those with type 2 diabetes. None of the type 1 diabetes patients smoked, while 30% of the type 2 diabetes patients did. About 54% of the type 1 diabetes patients were men, compared with 63% of the type 2 diabetes patients. The patients with type 2 diabetes had a rate of periodontal disease more than twice that of patients with type 1 diabetes. However, the researchers also found the factors that affected development of periodontal disease in these patients included age and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which identifies average plasma glucose concentration. The higher the number means the greater the risk of a patient developing complications of diabetes. Characteristics of periodontitis in patients with diabetes Type 1 Type 2 Patient age 19.6 57.1 Percent smokers 0% 30.3% Percent men 54% 63% Number of years diagnosed 7.0 years 10 years Rate of periodontal disease 41.2% 93.2% The type 1 diabetes patients with periodontal disease were generally older than those type 1 diabetes patients without periodontal disease (22.3 years versus 17.7 years). They had been diagnosed with diabetes longer (8.5 years versus 7.0 years) and had a higher HbA1c (10.2 versus 8.8). The type 2 diabetes patients with periodontal disease also were older than type 2 diabetes patients without periodontal disease (58 years versus 44.7 years). They had been diagnosed with diabetes for a longer period of time (10 years versus 5 years) and had a higher HbA1c (8.6 versus 5.7). Patients with type 2 diabetes presented positive associations with severe periodontal diseases as a result of tobacco use (more than 31% versus 14.3%) and more advanced age, the researchers noted. Diabetes type important Periodontal disease is more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those with type 1 diabetes, the authors concluded. "After adjustments performed by multivariate analysis, we found that the presence of [type 2 diabetes] increased the chance to have periodontal disease," the researchers wrote.@

No child should snore. If yours does, please speak with your pediatrician ASAP. https://www.soundsleephealth.com/blog/consequences-of-untreated-obstructive-sleep-apnea-in-children
Looking for information on sleep apnea in children? Want to know the consequences of untreated sleep apnea in the the child? This article addresses this and...

Short Sleep Linked to Death in Patients With Heart Disease, Stroke Megan Brooks June 05, 2017 BOSTON — The risk for death associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cerebrovascular disease (CBV) is significantly increased in adults who get fewer than 6 hours of sleep a night, a new study with objective sleep data indicates. Short sleep "multiplies the risk of poor outcomes in people with CVD or stroke," Julio Fernandez-Mendoza, PhD, from the Sleep Research & Treatment Center, Penn State University College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania, told Medscape Medical News. "We need to look beyond sleep apnea when it comes to CVD morbidity and mortality," Dr Fernandez-Mendoza said. "Most of these patients without sleep apnea but with CVD or stroke may complain of poor sleep or chronic insomnia, and we know now that when such objective short sleep is present their long-term prognosis is much worse." He presented his research here at SLEEP 2017: 31st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Two-Fold Increased Risk Short sleep duration has been associated with CVD and CBV disease and mortality, but most studies have relied on self-reported sleep habits. Therefore, the role of sleep in predicting mortality remains unclear. Dr Fernandez-Mendoza and colleagues assessed objective polysomnographic data from 1741 men and women in the Penn State Adult Cohort, a general population cohort that's been followed for more than 16 years. CVD was defined by a history of heart disease, including hypertension or diabetes, and CBV by a history of stroke. Polysomnographic total sleep time was classified as normal (6 hours or more) or short (less than 6 hours) duration. The researchers used Cox proportional hazard models controlling for multiple potential confounders to test the interaction between objective sleep duration, CVD, and CBV on mortality. "We found that the risk of mortality associated with CVD and stroke was enhanced in those who slept less than 6 hours in the lab; specifically, their risk of mortality was 1.8-fold and 2.4-fold, respectively. In contrast, in individuals who slept more than 6 hours in the lab, the risk of mortality associated with CVD or stroke was not significantly increased," Dr Fernandez-Mendoza told Medscape Medical News. In a separate study involving the Penn State Adult cohort, published online May 17 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the researchers found that the risk for death associated with metabolic syndrome is increased in patients with short sleep duration. The researchers say adults with CVD or stroke who are short sleepers likely have greater central autonomic and metabolic dysfunction. Clinical trials are needed to test whether lengthening sleep improves the long-term prognosis of adults with CVD, stroke, or metabolic syndrome, they add. Commenting on the study for Medscape Medical News, Steven Feinsilver, MD, director of sleep medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, noted that "it's really hard to get accurate information about how much people really sleep because you can't trust what people tell you." Short sleepers typically estimate their sleep very badly, he noted. "We all remember when we are awake. We don't remember when we are asleep. So any cohort like this, where you have some objective measurement of how much people really sleep, is pretty interesting, and if you want to prove that bad sleep is bad for your heart it's nice to have some objective data." "It would be great if we could tell people to get more sleep and they will be less likely to die of heart disease and stroke — it is quite possible that that is true, but you can't tell that from this study," cautioned Dr Feinsilver. The study had no commercial funding. Dr Fernandez-Mendoza and Dr Feinsilver have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. SLEEP 2017: 31st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies. Poster 1015. Presented June 5, 2017. For more Medscape Neurology news, join us on Facebook and Twitter

Very nice office. I was always relaxed due to the view out of the window.

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/wellness_articles.asp?id=1529
It's easy to grin when things are going your way, but did you know that something as simple as a smile can improve your health, your mood and your relationships?