Beach Landscaping

87
Beach Landscaping
Beach Landscaping is listed in the Landscaping Services & Supplies category in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Displayed below are the social networks for Beach Landscaping which include a Facebook page, a Google Plus page, a Linkedin company page and a Twitter account. The activity and popularity of Beach Landscaping on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 87.

Beach Landscaping offers Landscaping services in Myrtle Beach SC.
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MATT'S ANNUAL SOAP-BOX RANT: I'm sure everyone, as I am, is enjoying this extremely mild winter. Being outside... fb.me/DfEzKiCU

MATT'S ANNUAL SOAP-BOX RANT: I'm sure everyone, as I am, is enjoying this extremely mild winter. Being outside all day yesterday gave me an opportunity to enjoy all of the flowers available to see in the landscape: Camellias, Forsythia, Loropetalum, Tea Olives, Cherry tree blossoms, and, even some Azaleas were in full bloom, in addition to the bulbs that are always in bloom at this time of year. One thing that I found particularly interesting is seeing all of the lawns starting to green up (and not just the weeds). While the early greening up of our lawns is probably a welcome site for landscape enthusiasts, it does not come without potentially negative consequences. PLEASE do not do anything to encourage new growth right now, such as, watering or the use of nitrogen fertilizers. "Over-irrigation, excessive rainfall, and/or nitrogen fertilization during late summer and early autumn can provide conditions that favor disease infection and increase cool season weed problems. The resulting succulent grass is also susceptible to winter damage from freezing temperatures. Starting irrigation or fertilization too early in spring before natural green up of turf may result in similar problems." (That is a selection from the Clemson Extension website on the management of warm season grasses. Here is the link: https://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/hot_topics/2016/pdf/09%20preparing_managing_warm_season_grasses_during_the_offseason%202%20col.pdf) The turfgrasses that we have in this area require 1" of water per month during the dormant season, and, we recieve at least that much from Mother Nature. In the active growing season, which does not occur until the lawn has fully come out of dormancy, our lawns require 1" of water per week. Mother Nature does a lot of the work for us there as well, however, in times of drought we do need to rely on our friend, the irrigation system. I always tell people that it, ideally, it is better to NOT have a set program and to run a manual cycle when it the grass shows signs of drought stress. "Irrigation management is also important to the success of a centipedegrass lawn. Centipedegrass inherently has a shallow root system. Light, frequent watering will lead to a weak, shallow root system unable to withstand periods of drought. Centipedegrass should be watered infrequently, only when needed as water stress appears in the turf. Then irrigate to a depth of 6 inches. Do not irrigate again until the turf is thoroughly dry." (another Clemson Extension article: http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/lawns/hgic1209.html) With all of that in mind, I hope you all have a Happy Spring, and, as a reminder, let it happen naturally. There is no need to rush it. There will be plenty of time to enjoy your yards in the summer. Please do not hesitate to call, text or email if you have any questions.
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A link that further explains my previous post regarding watering, from Clemson Extension:... fb.me/2HOFUKI3u

A link that further explains my previous post regarding watering, from Clemson Extension: http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/lawns/hgic1207.html
Watering lawns in South Carolina. Lawn irrigation during summer drought. How and when to irrigate warm and cool season grass, bermuda, centipede, zoysia, St. Augustine, fescue. Tests of water needs


A note from your friendly neighborhood landscaper: People, I know that everybody is excited that spring is here,... fb.me/11t3uD1d7

A note from your friendly neighborhood landscaper: People, I know that everybody is excited that spring is here, as am I. I know that flowers are blooming and the grass is Greening up, however, it is not yet time to turn your irrigation systems on. It is still cold at night and we are getting natural rainfall right now that is sufficient for established Lawns and shrubs. More harm than good can come from watering too much then too little at this time. The grasses here are fairly drought tolerant and perform better when they are allowed to stress a little bit and watered less frequently (yet for longer periods of time). Lawns that are overwatered will have issues with thatch, weeds, insect pests, and disease. Besides that, it is still very cold at night and it will be close to freezing on Saturday night into Sunday morning. If you have already primed your pump you are in danger of it cracking if it does freeze. Please do not rush to water and assume that lack of water is the reason for your lawn/shrub/tree problems. Ask a professional first. I only tell you this because I hate to see people waste money unnecessarily.


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http://wbtw.com/2016/03/29/spring-greening-local-landscaping-professional-provides-planting-tips/
MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WBTW) – Spring is has sprung, and the sun and warmer temperatures have some people thinking about updating their lawn. Matt Freedman, President of Beach Landscaping, joined …

Attention! Anyone with a Centipede or St. Augustine Lawn: These types of grasses do not thrive until temperatures are consistently in the 80's and the nights aren't as cool as the 50's. If your lawn is not looking good now, do not despair just yet (unless you have mole crickets or brown patch- please call if that may be the case....). Patience is important for the sake of your sanity. Do not rush to go out to box stores to buy pieces of sod, just yet. In the words of the immortal, Aaron Rodger, "R-E-L-A-X, Relaxxx....."