The Luggage Store

72
The Luggage Store
The Luggage Store is listed in the Arts Organizations & Centers category in San Francisco, California. Displayed below is the only current social network for The Luggage Store which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of The Luggage Store on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 72.

Contact information for The Luggage Store is:
1007 Market St
San Francisco, CA 94103
(415) 255-5971

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72
The Luggage Store has an overall ZapScore of 72. This means that The Luggage Store has a higher ZapScore than 72% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in San Francisco, California is 36 and in the Arts Organizations & Centers category is 57. Learn more about ZapScore.

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The Luggage Store Gallery shared their event.
Gabby Miller - "Second Sleep" Let me be a boat, a raft, a bridge for those who wish to cross the flood. Miller will create an installation of hundreds of hand-built wooden meditation benches. The gallery will function as a temporary meditation hall with spontaneous and planned events in the space. “This is a moment of great unrest and wakefulness. Use the poison of this world to fuel your practice” Miller’s teacher says. Miller has created work using heavy-crude bunker oil and other materials gathered while she crossed The Pacific Ocean from Oakland on a container ship. “Second Sleep” looks at the relationships between the global supply chain, imperialism and environmental degradation, and attempts to imagine a world through their ruins. “Second Sleep” can come after hours of quiet wakefulness. Before the Industrial Revolution, most people in Western Society experienced two major intervals of sleep, punctuated by an hour or more of quiet wakefulness. The succeeding interval was called “Second Sleep”. “In the in-between-time people wrote down their dreams, talked with or had sex with their bedfellows, took part in magic rituals, or sometimes went to visit their neighbors by candlelight.” (1) A meditation practice, especially sitting together with others, can give us access to moments of quiet wakefulness, glimpses of the possibility of collective liberation. A recent project involved crossing the Pacific Ocean on a containership. During that time, she got to know crew members and painted portraits of their loved ones at home for them using heavy crude oil and ink. Collaborating with the crew, they held an exhibition in the swimming pool room of the ship. Since disembarking, she continues to work with a supply of heavy crude oil extracted from the ships engine, as well as exploring alternate energy sources. This project was funded by the Asian Cultural Council and culminated in an exhibition at Nha San Collective in Hanoi and a residency at Random Parts Gallery in Oakland. Practice Benches (A Boat, A Raft, A Bridge for Those Who Wish to Cross The Flood) are hand-built from found or donated wood. While she installs, Miller will be present for meditation and invites visitors to join in the sessions. The benches are for sale for anyone who would like to buy them for whatever price works for the buyer, using the "Gift Economics" model, an alternate to a consumer mentalist that encourages a mindset of generosity, sustainability, and community empowerment. (1)*from “At Day’s Close: Night in Time’s Past” by Robert Ekirch (2) from “The Bodhisattva Way” by Shantideva BIO Gabby Miller has a degree in cultural anthropology from Reed College in Portland, and will be attending UC Irvine for her MFA this fall. Much of her organizing work is based in Southeast Asia, with Nha San Collective and The Queer Forever Festival in Hanoi. She has participated in projects and exhibitions nationally and internationally, including Somarts, YBCA, The Museum of Capitalism, and The Luggage Store. Miller often use s personal objects and her body in her work, inventing a visual language through experiments merging sculpture, photography, performance, and video to describe how we transport of history and iconic signifiers of identity across geopolitical and cultural boundaries in the age of globalization ___________________________________________________________________ Brett Amory - "This Too Shall Pass" “Wars and temper tantrums are the makeshifts of ignorance; regrets are illuminations come too late.” ― Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces This Too Shall Pass is one of Amory’s largest installations featuring a typical all American house that utilizes black, white, and gray to cast a shadow on the color of the very notion of the American Dream. In addition to this large installation, the show’s paintings, sculptures and video installation, investigates the concepts of the American Dream and extrapolates out to the birth, death and rebirth of a society. Through personal introspection, Amory not only challenges the notions of the downfall and rebuilding of a nation but looks inwardly to address personal rebirth and growth through introspection, self-exploration and challenges of and learning from our own internal struggles. Amory challenges the notion of the American Dream, the idea of resiliency, and the concepts of civic failure and success. He addresses his own internal personal struggles by shining a light on such myths as Remus and Romulus. Amory carries on the tradition of passing along the torch of mythology in contemporary terms. Some may remember how the American Dream and 1950s post-war optimism were characterized by television shows such as Father Knows Best and Leave it to Beaver, both epitomizing the superficial nature and embodiment of “the American Dream.” Amory’s use of symbolism serves to ignite memories, and conversations of community, and separation. This show attempts to expose how past cultural decisions have shaped the present and how present decisions will influence the future of our communities. Under the façade of the success and beauty of what was portrayed in the 1950’s, racism, sexism and homophobia were prominent beliefs. What does it mean, in 2017, to hear that we are going to “make America great again”? Does that mean that we are going to turn back the hands of time to 1950’s era conservative philosophies? This installation is intended to serves as a contemplation about America’s struggles and victories. Amory’s sculptural use of colorful flowers shines light on the determination to rise above negative circumstances and surmount improbable circumstances (be they natural disasters or man-made catastrophes). Will the people espousing reactionary ideals, that want to turn back the hands of time and return us to a society of a black and white bygone era actually make America great again? Will the unification and galvanization of progressives brought about as the result of the current election steer us toward a society full of color? What is the American Dream? What is personal growth? How do we rectify our own personal struggles within the context of societal and internal struggles? Amory attempts to present these questions and to promote both reflection and conversation. Amory Brett Amory gained broad recognition for his ongoing series “Waiting” (2001–), depicting anonymous commuters he encountered in urban settings; it was lauded for its psychological depth and representations of alienation in contemporary society. These paintings are based on photographs taken by the artist, who explained he was drawn to subjects who appeared out of place, alienated, or awkward. In the more recent paintings from the series, Amory began to eliminate parts of the architecture or scenery to heighten the sense of isolation. He paints in a realist style characterized by gestural brushwork and the use of translucent layers of paint for a hazy effect; his palette is muted and tends towards contrasts of dark and light. While his influences vary, Amory has said that the New Topographics have been an influence, for their similar pursuit of capturing beauty in the everyday and overlooked. Amory has had solo shows locally nationally and internationally, and is currently showing at the Jonathon Levine Gallery in New York, and has shown with Lazarides in London, and the Hashimoto Gallery in SF. Amory was a recent artist in resident at the De Young Museum in SF.
Art · 130 people

The Luggage Store Gallery shared their event.
Gabby Miller - "Second Sleep" Let me be a boat, a raft, a bridge for those who wish to cross the flood. Miller will create an installation of hundreds of hand-built wooden meditation benches. The gallery will function as a temporary meditation hall with spontaneous and planned events in the space. “This is a moment of great unrest and wakefulness. Use the poison of this world to fuel your practice” Miller’s teacher says. Miller has created work using heavy-crude bunker oil and other materials gathered while she crossed The Pacific Ocean from Oakland on a container ship. “Second Sleep” looks at the relationships between the global supply chain, imperialism and environmental degradation, and attempts to imagine a world through their ruins. “Second Sleep” can come after hours of quiet wakefulness. Before the Industrial Revolution, most people in Western Society experienced two major intervals of sleep, punctuated by an hour or more of quiet wakefulness. The succeeding interval was called “Second Sleep”. “In the in-between-time people wrote down their dreams, talked with or had sex with their bedfellows, took part in magic rituals, or sometimes went to visit their neighbors by candlelight.” (1) A meditation practice, especially sitting together with others, can give us access to moments of quiet wakefulness, glimpses of the possibility of collective liberation. A recent project involved crossing the Pacific Ocean on a containership. During that time, she got to know crew members and painted portraits of their loved ones at home for them using heavy crude oil and ink. Collaborating with the crew, they held an exhibition in the swimming pool room of the ship. Since disembarking, she continues to work with a supply of heavy crude oil extracted from the ships engine, as well as exploring alternate energy sources. This project was funded by the Asian Cultural Council and culminated in an exhibition at Nha San Collective in Hanoi and a residency at Random Parts Gallery in Oakland. Practice Benches (A Boat, A Raft, A Bridge for Those Who Wish to Cross The Flood) are hand-built from found or donated wood. While she installs, Miller will be present for meditation and invites visitors to join in the sessions. The benches are for sale for anyone who would like to buy them for whatever price works for the buyer, using the "Gift Economics" model, an alternate to a consumer mentalist that encourages a mindset of generosity, sustainability, and community empowerment. (1)*from “At Day’s Close: Night in Time’s Past” by Robert Ekirch (2) from “The Bodhisattva Way” by Shantideva BIO Gabby Miller has a degree in cultural anthropology from Reed College in Portland, and will be attending UC Irvine for her MFA this fall. Much of her organizing work is based in Southeast Asia, with Nha San Collective and The Queer Forever Festival in Hanoi. She has participated in projects and exhibitions nationally and internationally, including Somarts, YBCA, The Museum of Capitalism, and The Luggage Store. Miller often use s personal objects and her body in her work, inventing a visual language through experiments merging sculpture, photography, performance, and video to describe how we transport of history and iconic signifiers of identity across geopolitical and cultural boundaries in the age of globalization ___________________________________________________________________ Brett Amory - "This Too Shall Pass" “Wars and temper tantrums are the makeshifts of ignorance; regrets are illuminations come too late.” ― Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces This Too Shall Pass is one of Amory’s largest installations featuring a typical all American house that utilizes black, white, and gray to cast a shadow on the color of the very notion of the American Dream. In addition to this large installation, the show’s paintings, sculptures and video installation, investigates the concepts of the American Dream and extrapolates out to the birth, death and rebirth of a society. Through personal introspection, Amory not only challenges the notions of the downfall and rebuilding of a nation but looks inwardly to address personal rebirth and growth through introspection, self-exploration and challenges of and learning from our own internal struggles. Amory challenges the notion of the American Dream, the idea of resiliency, and the concepts of civic failure and success. He addresses his own internal personal struggles by shining a light on such myths as Remus and Romulus. Amory carries on the tradition of passing along the torch of mythology in contemporary terms. Some may remember how the American Dream and 1950s post-war optimism were characterized by television shows such as Father Knows Best and Leave it to Beaver, both epitomizing the superficial nature and embodiment of “the American Dream.” Amory’s use of symbolism serves to ignite memories, and conversations of community, and separation. This show attempts to expose how past cultural decisions have shaped the present and how present decisions will influence the future of our communities. Under the façade of the success and beauty of what was portrayed in the 1950’s, racism, sexism and homophobia were prominent beliefs. What does it mean, in 2017, to hear that we are going to “make America great again”? Does that mean that we are going to turn back the hands of time to 1950’s era conservative philosophies? This installation is intended to serves as a contemplation about America’s struggles and victories. Amory’s sculptural use of colorful flowers shines light on the determination to rise above negative circumstances and surmount improbable circumstances (be they natural disasters or man-made catastrophes). Will the people espousing reactionary ideals, that want to turn back the hands of time and return us to a society of a black and white bygone era actually make America great again? Will the unification and galvanization of progressives brought about as the result of the current election steer us toward a society full of color? What is the American Dream? What is personal growth? How do we rectify our own personal struggles within the context of societal and internal struggles? Amory attempts to present these questions and to promote both reflection and conversation. Amory Brett Amory gained broad recognition for his ongoing series “Waiting” (2001–), depicting anonymous commuters he encountered in urban settings; it was lauded for its psychological depth and representations of alienation in contemporary society. These paintings are based on photographs taken by the artist, who explained he was drawn to subjects who appeared out of place, alienated, or awkward. In the more recent paintings from the series, Amory began to eliminate parts of the architecture or scenery to heighten the sense of isolation. He paints in a realist style characterized by gestural brushwork and the use of translucent layers of paint for a hazy effect; his palette is muted and tends towards contrasts of dark and light. While his influences vary, Amory has said that the New Topographics have been an influence, for their similar pursuit of capturing beauty in the everyday and overlooked. Amory has had solo shows locally nationally and internationally, and is currently showing at the Jonathon Levine Gallery in New York, and has shown with Lazarides in London, and the Hashimoto Gallery in SF. Amory was a recent artist in resident at the De Young Museum in SF.
Art · 130 people

The Luggage Store Gallery shared a link.
Born and raised in New Mexico, Rye Purvis relocated to San Francisco in 2007 to attend the San Francisco Art Institute, where she graduated with a BFA in Painting in 2011. An incredibly talented still life painter, Purvis manages to assemble our mundane commercial vices (the corner bodega’s usual su...

The Luggage Store Gallery added an event.
Gabby Miller - "Second Sleep" Let me be a boat, a raft, a bridge for those who wish to cross the flood. Miller will create an installation of hundreds of hand-built wooden meditation benches. The gallery will function as a temporary meditation hall with spontaneous and planned events in the space. “This is a moment of great unrest and wakefulness. Use the poison of this world to fuel your practice” Miller’s teacher says. Miller has created work using heavy-crude bunker oil and other materials gathered while she crossed The Pacific Ocean from Oakland on a container ship. “Second Sleep” looks at the relationships between the global supply chain, imperialism and environmental degradation, and attempts to imagine a world through their ruins. “Second Sleep” can come after hours of quiet wakefulness. Before the Industrial Revolution, most people in Western Society experienced two major intervals of sleep, punctuated by an hour or more of quiet wakefulness. The succeeding interval was called “Second Sleep”. “In the in-between-time people wrote down their dreams, talked with or had sex with their bedfellows, took part in magic rituals, or sometimes went to visit their neighbors by candlelight.” (1) A meditation practice, especially sitting together with others, can give us access to moments of quiet wakefulness, glimpses of the possibility of collective liberation. A recent project involved crossing the Pacific Ocean on a containership. During that time, she got to know crew members and painted portraits of their loved ones at home for them using heavy crude oil and ink. Collaborating with the crew, they held an exhibition in the swimming pool room of the ship. Since disembarking, she continues to work with a supply of heavy crude oil extracted from the ships engine, as well as exploring alternate energy sources. This project was funded by the Asian Cultural Council and culminated in an exhibition at Nha San Collective in Hanoi and a residency at Random Parts Gallery in Oakland. Practice Benches (A Boat, A Raft, A Bridge for Those Who Wish to Cross The Flood) are hand-built from found or donated wood. While she installs, Miller will be present for meditation and invites visitors to join in the sessions. The benches are for sale for anyone who would like to buy them for whatever price works for the buyer, using the "Gift Economics" model, an alternate to a consumer mentalist that encourages a mindset of generosity, sustainability, and community empowerment. (1)*from “At Day’s Close: Night in Time’s Past” by Robert Ekirch (2) from “The Bodhisattva Way” by Shantideva BIO Gabby Miller has a degree in cultural anthropology from Reed College in Portland, and will be attending UC Irvine for her MFA this fall. Much of her organizing work is based in Southeast Asia, with Nha San Collective and The Queer Forever Festival in Hanoi. She has participated in projects and exhibitions nationally and internationally, including Somarts, YBCA, The Museum of Capitalism, and The Luggage Store. Miller often use s personal objects and her body in her work, inventing a visual language through experiments merging sculpture, photography, performance, and video to describe how we transport of history and iconic signifiers of identity across geopolitical and cultural boundaries in the age of globalization ___________________________________________________________________ Brett Amory - "This Too Shall Pass" “Wars and temper tantrums are the makeshifts of ignorance; regrets are illuminations come too late.” ― Joseph Campbell, The Hero With a Thousand Faces This Too Shall Pass is one of Amory’s largest installations featuring a typical all American house that utilizes black, white, and gray to cast a shadow on the color of the very notion of the American Dream. In addition to this large installation, the show’s paintings, sculptures and video installation, investigates the concepts of the American Dream and extrapolates out to the birth, death and rebirth of a society. Through personal introspection, Amory not only challenges the notions of the downfall and rebuilding of a nation but looks inwardly to address personal rebirth and growth through introspection, self-exploration and challenges of and learning from our own internal struggles. Amory challenges the notion of the American Dream, the idea of resiliency, and the concepts of civic failure and success. He addresses his own internal personal struggles by shining a light on such myths as Remus and Romulus. Amory carries on the tradition of passing along the torch of mythology in contemporary terms. Some may remember how the American Dream and 1950s post-war optimism were characterized by television shows such as Father Knows Best and Leave it to Beaver, both epitomizing the superficial nature and embodiment of “the American Dream.” Amory’s use of symbolism serves to ignite memories, and conversations of community, and separation. This show attempts to expose how past cultural decisions have shaped the present and how present decisions will influence the future of our communities. Under the façade of the success and beauty of what was portrayed in the 1950’s, racism, sexism and homophobia were prominent beliefs. What does it mean, in 2017, to hear that we are going to “make America great again”? Does that mean that we are going to turn back the hands of time to 1950’s era conservative philosophies? This installation is intended to serves as a contemplation about America’s struggles and victories. Amory’s sculptural use of colorful flowers shines light on the determination to rise above negative circumstances and surmount improbable circumstances (be they natural disasters or man-made catastrophes). Will the people espousing reactionary ideals, that want to turn back the hands of time and return us to a society of a black and white bygone era actually make America great again? Will the unification and galvanization of progressives brought about as the result of the current election steer us toward a society full of color? What is the American Dream? What is personal growth? How do we rectify our own personal struggles within the context of societal and internal struggles? Amory attempts to present these questions and to promote both reflection and conversation. Amory Brett Amory gained broad recognition for his ongoing series “Waiting” (2001–), depicting anonymous commuters he encountered in urban settings; it was lauded for its psychological depth and representations of alienation in contemporary society. These paintings are based on photographs taken by the artist, who explained he was drawn to subjects who appeared out of place, alienated, or awkward. In the more recent paintings from the series, Amory began to eliminate parts of the architecture or scenery to heighten the sense of isolation. He paints in a realist style characterized by gestural brushwork and the use of translucent layers of paint for a hazy effect; his palette is muted and tends towards contrasts of dark and light. While his influences vary, Amory has said that the New Topographics have been an influence, for their similar pursuit of capturing beauty in the everyday and overlooked. Amory has had solo shows locally nationally and internationally, and is currently showing at the Jonathon Levine Gallery in New York, and has shown with Lazarides in London, and the Hashimoto Gallery in SF. Amory was a recent artist in resident at the De Young Museum in SF.
Art · 130 people

The Luggage Store Gallery shared Outsound Presents's event.
8:00 pm Fistortion Brian Pedersen-sax, Jay Korber-drums, Greg Gorlen-electronics, 8:40 pm New Olduvai Trio (Philadelphia powerhouse freejazz) Elliott Levin- words/reeds, Tom Rollison- guitar, Mogauwane Mahlole- percussion 9:20 pm Blood Oath - (a noise-metal saxophone-drum duo from Los Angeles) fistortion: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6GI0SM0_ck If one was to believe descriptive snippets, the thing to do when Elliott Levin approaches is find a place to hide. In a worst case scenario, try to climb a tree -- at least, that is the advice hikers would receive about the oncoming approach of something "ferocious...frenzied...bearlike." The weekend grocery list of Levin credits includes playing with Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes for a decade as the saxophonist in the Sound of Philadelphia band, as well as with Odean Popes' Saxophone Choir, Tyrone Hill, Don Preston, Scram!, New Ghost, Atzilut (Fourth World), Talking Free Bebop, and various collaborations with bassist Jamaladeen Tacuma. Combining dark ambient, harsh noise, doom and death metal with free improvisation, Bloood Oath brings together different extreme sound approaches and techniques. In live shows they have been described as an extreme physical entity. Ulrich Krieger is a saxophone player in the worlds of rock, noise, contemporary composition, and free improvised music, as well as a composer of chamber music and electronic music. He has been active in exploring the boundaries of saxophone playing in rock and noise collaborating with Lou Reed (Metal Machine Trio, Lou Reed Band), Lee Ranaldo (Text of Light), Faust, and Merzbow. Joshua Michael Carro is a sound, visual, and performing artist who is interested in simple materials, complex sound processing, and long duration. Based in Los Angeles, Carro has performed in countless recitals, concerts, and recordings across the U.S.A., Canada, and Europe with sound work performances and commissions by The Futurist Intoners in Cleveland Museum of Art and Singapore Art Science Center, NMCE, UC Berkeley Cellist Ensemble, Wild Rumpus, What’s Next? Ensemble, and Now Hear Ensemble. $6-15 sliding
Music