Adams Bookkeeping Service

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Adams Bookkeeping Service
Adams Bookkeeping Service is listed in the Accountants Certified Public category in Lorain, Ohio. Displayed below is the only current social network for Adams Bookkeeping Service which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Adams Bookkeeping Service on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 61.

Contact information for Adams Bookkeeping Service is:
5050 Elyria Ave
Lorain, OH 44055
(440) 233-5843

"Adams Bookkeeping Service" - Social Networks

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Adams Bookkeeping Service has an overall ZapScore of 61. This means that Adams Bookkeeping Service has a higher ZapScore than 61% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Lorain, Ohio is 36 and in the Accountants Certified Public category is 16. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Social Posts for Adams Bookkeeping Service

Happy New Year! Another year is ended and now is the time to call and book your appointment to get your taxes done. Jackie has been doing taxes since 1972 and Billie has been doing taxes since 2013. We book appointments at one hour increments plus we do accept drop offs. If you would like to drop them off please be certain that we have your current phone number in case we have questions. Our hours as of January 22, 2018 will be - Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 9 am till 7 pm. This office is closed on Tuesday and Sunday. Until 1/22/18 call first to be certain we are in since our hours are flexible at this time. Billie is in the office and waiting for your call to schedule your tax appointment. Looking forward to seeing everyone.

IRS Announces Opening of 2018 Filing Season Tax season to begin January 29 The IRS will begin accepting tax returns on January 29. Many software companies will be accepting tax returns before January 29 and then will submit the returns when IRS systems open. Although the IRS will begin accepting both electronic and paper tax returns January 29, paper returns will begin processing later in mid-February as system updates continue. The IRS cannot issue refunds claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) before mid-February. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or on debit cards starting on February 27, if they chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with the tax return.

It is that time of year again. First question of the year: Can I claim my married child as a dependent? My response: Is the child still in school full time and under the age of 24? No . then no. Still questioning it? Then I ask did the child earn wages in excess $4,050? Is the spouse filing a tax return to get a refund because they have no tax liability? If the answer is Yes then No you can not claim your child. Still don't believe me? Then read this chart and have a wonderful day. Table 5 from the IRS website: Overview of the Rules for Claiming an Exemption for a Dependent CAUTION ! This table is only an overview of the rules. For details, see the rest of this publication. You can't claim any dependents if you, or your spouse if filing jointly, could be claimed as a dependent by another taxpayer. You can't claim a married person who files a joint return as a dependent unless that joint return is filed only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid. You can't claim a person as a dependent unless that person is a U.S. citizen, U.S. resident alien, U.S. national, or a resident of Canada or Mexico. 1 You can't claim a person as a dependent unless that person is your qualifying child or qualifying relative. Tests To Be a Qualifying Child Tests To Be a Qualifying Relative 1. The child must be your son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, or a descendant of any of them. 2. The child must be (a) under age 19 at the end of the year and younger than you (or your spouse if filing jointly), (b) under age 24 at the end of the year, a student, and younger than you (or your spouse if filing jointly), or (c) any age if permanently and totally disabled. 3. The child must have lived with you for more than half of the year. 4. The child must not have provided more than half of his or her own support for the year. 5. The child must not be filing a joint return for the year (unless that joint return is filed only to claim a refund of withheld income tax or estimated tax paid). If the child meets the rules to be a qualifying child of more than one person, only one person can actually treat the child as a qualifying child. See Qualifying Child of More Than One Person, later, to find out which person is the person entitled to claim the child as a qualifying child. 1. The person can't be your qualifying child or the qualifying child of any other taxpayer. 2. The person either (a) must be related to you in one of the ways listed under Relatives who don't have to live with you, or (b) must live with you all year as a member of your household2 (and your relationship must not violate local law). 3. The person's gross income for the year must be less than $4,050. 4. You must provide more than half of the person's total support for the year. 4 1 There is an exception for certain adopted children. 2 There are exceptions for temporary absences, children who were born or died during the year, children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), and kidnapped children. 3 There is an exception if the person is disabled and has income from a sheltered workshop. 4 There are exceptions for multiple support agreements, children of divorced or separated parents (or parents who live apart), and kidnapped children.

We will need to remind our customers of this for the upcoming tax season...Refunds Held for Those Claiming EITC or ACTC Until Mid-Feb By law, the IRS cannot issue refunds for people claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) before mid-February. The law requires the IRS to hold the entire refund — even the portion not associated with EITC or ACTC. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards starting on Feb. 27, 2018, if direct deposit was used and there are no other issues with the tax return. This additional period is due to several factors, including the Presidents Day holiday and banking and financial systems needing time to process deposits. This law change, which took effect at the beginning of 2017, helps ensure that taxpayers receive the refund they’re due by giving the IRS more time to detect and prevent fraud. As always, the IRS cautions taxpayers not to rely on getting a refund by a certain date, especially when making major purchases or paying bills. Though the IRS issues more than nine out of 10 refunds in less than 21 days, some returns require further review.

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