Ambruster Chapel

73


Ambruster Chapel is listed in the Funeral Homes & Directors category in Saint Louis, Missouri. Displayed below is the only current social network for Ambruster Chapel which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Ambruster Chapel on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 73.

Contact information for Ambruster Chapel is:
6633 Clayton Rd
Saint Louis, MO 63117
(314) 863-1300
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Social Posts for Ambruster Chapel

Saw this article when I picked today's St. Louis Post-Dispatch. This story is also getting picked up by many in the national media. Sad.
Dozens of headstones at the Chesed Shel Emeth Cemetery were pushed over sometime during the weekend.

With #OnlineArrangements, you can take your time to select the #arrangements which are best for your preferences and budget. Explore different options until you find those that are right for you. http://www.ambrusterchapel.com/home/preplan?pn=0&fh_id=14865

#FridayFun #BrutallyHonestObituary
Leslie Ray Charping's family didn't mince words writing his obituary — actually, they hardly held back.

In honor of #ValentinesDay yesterday! #FuneralHomeLoveStories http://www.myasd.com/blog/valentines-day-14-inspirational-funeral-home-love-stories

Ambruster Chapel shared Confessions of a Funeral Director's photo.
"This act, my friends, is a beautiful step away from death denial and towards death positivity."
A couple days ago I shared a beautiful experience I had at a nursing home. As I shared in that post, when we funeral directors come to remove a deceased person from a nursing home, most nursing homes have a "hide the body" mentality or a "back door policy" that ushers the deceased out the back door so no one sees it. As I've come to find out, some nursing homes have a "front door policy" where the death is acknowledged and the dead honored by the nursing home and its staff. My recent experience with this "front door policy" included the nursing staff creating a walk of honor. The staff lined the hallway walls as I left the nursing home with the deceased, acknowledging the life lived and lost. When I shared my experience with the "front door policy" and the "walk of honor", Lisa B. shared this beautiful photo of how her grandfather's nursing home practiced this acknowledgment of death when her grandfather died. As you can see, the staff is creating this beautiful walk of honor to acknowledge the passing of Lisa's grandfather as he leaves the nursing home. I asked Lisa if I could share the photo with you and she gave me permission. This act, my friends, is a beautiful step away from death denial and towards death positivity.