Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc

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Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc
Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc is listed in the Libraries category in Watertown, Massachusetts. Displayed below are the social networks for Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc which include a Facebook page, a Twitter account and a YouTube channel. The activity and popularity of Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 98.

Contact information for Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc is:
65 Main St
Watertown, MA 02472
(617) 926-2562

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Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc has an overall ZapScore of 98. This means that Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc has a higher ZapScore than 98% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Watertown, Massachusetts is 38 and in the Libraries category is 55. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Social Posts for Armenian Library and Museum of America Inc

Armenian Museum of America added an event.
October 8th Adele an Haig Der Manuelian Galleries, 3rd Floor. The Hidden Treasure project is an unprecedented initiative in the history of classical music of the Caucasus. Initiated and produced by internationally acclaimed violinist Nune Melik, it is based on more than 7 years of research. Three trips to Armenia, funded by McGill University and the Canada Council for the Art were undertaken, resulting in the discovery of an impressive array of the rare musical scores andrelated material. The outstanding contribution made by Nune Melik has been highlighted in media publications such as Strings Magazine, Huffington Post, Armenian Mirror-Spectator, and various TV programs internationally. Hidden Treasure has been presented in numerous performances to audiences at Carnegie Hall, the Lincoln Centre; and broadcast on CBC Radio. Striving to educate the North American public about the heritage of her country’s music, numerous lectures were given by Nune Melik: Columbia University, New York; Arizona State University, Tucson and Wayne University, Detroit being among them. The program has been selected as part of the national tour of the Jeunesses Musicales Canada, and China tour in 2019. Though enjoying collaboration with several pianists, Nuné formed a duo with a University of Montreal alum, Michel-Alexandre Broekaert, in 2010. Ever since, they have performed over 60concerts across Canada and the United States. In the upcoming seasons, the ensemble will be performing in more than a dozen cities in Canada and the United States, China and Europe to promote and launch the upcoming Hidden Treasure CD, recorded in collaboration with Yamaha Artist Services New York and McGill University.
Art

Armenian Museum of America shared their photo.
Many objects in our collection reveal the circular symbol of eternity across artistic traditions. Look for more artifacts such as this Embroidered Covering as we share our collection with you!
Embroidered covering, late 19th century This hand-loomed fabric with chain and interlacing stitch is typical of work from Malatia. The Armenian "Circle of Eternity" is evident here – a repeated form that symbolizes the concept of everlasting, celestial life. Around the 8th century, the use of the Armenian symbol of eternity had become a long established national iconographical practice and it keeps its meaning today – a reminder of the persistance, strength, and resolve of Armenian people and culture.

Armenian Museum of America added a new photo to the album: Artifacts — at Armenian Museum of America.
Embroidered covering, late 19th century This hand-loomed fabric with chain and interlacing stitch is typical of work from Malatia. The Armenian "Circle of Eternity" is evident here – a repeated form that symbolizes the concept of everlasting, celestial life. Around the 8th century, the use of the Armenian symbol of eternity had become a long established national iconographical practice and it keeps its meaning today – a reminder of the persistance, strength, and resolve of Armenian people and culture.

Armenian Museum of America shared their photo.
This small ceramic pitcher—produced in Holland for Armenian patrons—is a fine example of the interconnectedness of cultures on this planet. The vessel bears the portrait of a married couple dressed in the style of wealthy merchants of the Ottoman and Persian empires. Produced as an export, the pitcher provides precious and intimate evidence for the widespread trade networks between Europe and Asia during the early modern period. Now it lives with us at the Armenian Museum of America as part of our precious collection of ceramics.
Pitcher with Armenian Inscription, glazed ceramic, 1787



RT @berghahnbooks: 5/11: Taner Akçam to discuss #ArmenianGenocide at the @armenian_museum: ht.ly/kJ6L30bBzG4


RT @NAASR1955: @NAASR1955 cohosts #TanerAkcam Story Behind 'The Smoking Gun' 7pm May11 @Armenian_Museum conta.cc/2qhLdqb


RT @ProjSAVEArchive: Check out pictures from last week's Symposium, "New Perspectives on Photography in the Ottoman Empire" Ruth... https:/…


So wonderful to have Kate Kayaian and Stephen Porter here for "April in Paris" #ALMAConcerts #April #Paris https://t.co/odDhdbdnf2


University of Michigan's David Low speaking about composite photographs #newperspectives #photography #symposium https://t.co/KvvJZiflHb