American Antiquarian Society

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American Antiquarian Society
American Antiquarian Society is listed in the Organizations & Associations category in Worcester, Massachusetts. Displayed below are the social networks for American Antiquarian Society which include a Facebook page, a Instagram account and a Twitter account. The activity and popularity of American Antiquarian Society on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 97.

Contact information for American Antiquarian Society is:
185 Salisbury St
Worcester, MA 01609
(508) 471-1721
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Social Posts for American Antiquarian Society

This 1907 biography of Catherine Sweet Babington (b. 1815), was written by her son and tells the story (possibly apocryphal) of how Catherine became a Mason. At age 16 she hid in a Masonic hall in Kentucky during her uncles' meetings there. She continued this for over a year and learned all the rituals and activities of the then-secret society. Eventually she got caught and the lodge made her a Mason in order to protect the knowledge. The text is an interesting piece of Masonic history and seemed fitting for #womenshistorymonth #rarebook #masons #masonic

In May 1863, twenty-five year-old Edmund Mills Barton, a soldier in the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War, became sick and was sent to a military hospital in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He wrote this letter home to his father in Worcester, Massachusetts, to let the family know that he was alive and was suffering from typhoid fever. Barton survived the conflict, and in 1883 he became the librarian of the American Antiquarian Society! #warletterwednesday #aasmanuscript #civilwar #typhoid #antiquarian


RT @TheHistoryList: Rare opportunity to see @AmAntiquarian behind the scenes this Saturday on a private tour. Limited space. Reg. now https…


RT @HumanAtStanford: A digital humanities team @Stanford sifted through two centuries of British novels to gauge feelings about London: htt…


RT @Boston1775: Steven Bullock of @WPI on “Tea Sets & Tyranny: The Politics of Politeness in Early America” at @MHS1791, 29 Mar: https://t.…

We are seeking a new editor(s) and institutional partner for our online journal, common-place.org. Check out the call and spread the word!
Employment Opportunity


RT @kylebroberts: Great opportunity to work on a fantastic online journal. twitter.com/AmAntiquarian/…


RT @NEHgov: #MarthaNussbaum explains how the #humanities play a crucial role in preparing people to be good citizens. #JeffLec17 https://t.…

So, how do we all feel about trade catalogs? They are chock full of great research information on all kinds of products including plows, lamps, crockery and hardware -- usually with detailed price lists and illustrations. This one for artists' supplies was printed in Boston in 1850. While these volumes were considered quite utilitarian (boring, perhaps?) in their day, we find them just too darn interesting for this month's #boringbutbeautiful challenge. We could spend hours looking at all the options for window sashes, metal lathes, or sable brushes! #tradecatalogs #artsupplies #weneedatimemachine

For #typeTuesday we once again take you on a visit to the AAS bookplate collection as we hunt for another example of an exlibris created solely with type. We don't have any biographical information on Mr. Samuel E. Mack, but a former librarian has helpfully penciled "1820" in the lower margin. Help, Ancestry.com!! #aasbookplates #bookplate #bookplatespecial #ephemera #dingbat