American Foundation for The Blind

97


American Foundation for The Blind
American Foundation for The Blind is listed in the Social Service Organizations category in Atlanta, Georgia. Displayed below are the social networks for American Foundation for The Blind which include a Facebook page, a Pinterest page, a Twitter account and a YouTube channel. The activity and popularity of American Foundation for The Blind on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 97.

Contact information for American Foundation for The Blind is:
100 Peachtree St NW
Atlanta, GA 30303
(404) 525-2303
Do you own or manage this business? Click here to claim the American Foundation for The Blind listing and add social networks, logos, descriptions and more.

American Foundation for The Blind Contact Information:

Social Posts for American Foundation for The Blind


Looking for accessible reading apps? Check out this list on VisionAware: ow.ly/EXsE309Uh8P


Here is a list of smart questions to ask at your next job #interview as someone who is #blind or visually impaired ow.ly/OiD530a5upA


"Blind" Dating: Looking for Love in the Digital Age As Someone Who Is Visually Impaired ow.ly/e9Ge30a5u11


AFB's digital Helen Keller Archive is a model for other archives to provide complete online #accessibility. ow.ly/V8FJ30a9MuT


DYK the "Braille Tales Book Program" @APHfortheBlind offers free #braille books to participating families? ow.ly/xhCy30aeDhm

Another Historic Unanimous Supreme Court Special Ed Victory!!! Read the full story on AFB: ow.ly/DIkm30aajdv We are very pleased to report another rare unanimous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court with historic, and positive, implications for students with disabilities' receipt of a truly free and appropriate public education. As special education advocates, TVIs, and parents know all too well, the IDEA does not, and has never, stood for the proposition that special education and related services are supposed to ensure equal access and equal benefit for students with and without disabilities. However, over the course of time, particularly given the Supreme Court's ruling in the landmark Rowley case from years ago, many schools have argued, and courts have agreed, that all that is in fact required is that the student receive merely some appreciable benefit. Well now the Supreme Court has spoken again, and while the Court is not endorsing what a lot of advocates would have liked to have seen but were never likely to have gotten, namely some kind of equal benefit standard, the Court, in a unanimous opinion authored by Chief Justice Roberts issued just this morning, has made it crystal clear that being able to show merely some benefit from the services provided doesn't cut it. To meet their substantive obligations under IDEA, states, districts and schools must offer an IEP reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child's circumstances. (Image: Craft beads spelling out Individualized Education Plan (IEP). A plan used by public schools to support children with special needs and disabilities.)

A century of social and policy breakthroughs that improved the lives of Americans who are blind or visually impaired is the inspiration behind a public service announcement (PSA) from the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) that is airing nationally this month in Comcast markets. The global media and technology company is generously donating airtime for the 30-second spot, titled "Breakthroughs," through the end of March. The content of the PSA frames AFB's accomplishments as "building on the legacy of Helen Keller," a 100-year history that covers the creation of the Talking Book, which ushered in a new era of literacy for the visually impaired in the 1930s, up to the passage of landmark acts of legislation to improve access in the 70s, the 90s, and in the 2000s. Video Transcription: For almost 100 years, the American Foundation for the Blind has built on the legacy of Helen Keller—by connecting people with vision loss to the outside world, and fighting for those who fought for us. By giving a voice to those who need it, advocating for laws that help visually impaired people, and helping us communicate with the world in a whole new way. Helen would be proud of the breakthroughs made for generations of Americans with vision loss. As for tomorrow? Let's shoot for the moon.

American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) shared Helen Keller: The Official Fan Page's post.
Over the past two years, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) has digitized a vast portion of the over 80,000 items in Helen Keller’s unique and irreplaceable archive. These materials span from 1880 until after her death in 1968—from Alexander Graham Bell to President Lyndon B. Johnson. AFB’s odyssey to preserve Helen Keller’s collection is well under way. Our goal is no less ambitious than to pioneer the most accessible archive in the world. Students who are blind or visually impaired will be able to explore primary sources in a whole new way. Teachers will be able to create curricula and share them with their classrooms, and other educators. If other organizations follow our lead, there is no limit to what historians and researchers will be able to do. But our work is not done. With the future of NEH funding uncertain, we need your help. Helen Keller's history belongs to everyone. http://www.afb.org/blog/afb-blog/support-helen-keller-archive-and-national-endowment-for-the-humanities/12 Photo: Helen Keller is seated in three-quarter profile, possibly in a photographer's studio. She has her arm around the back of a young girl who is standing next to her. Keller is wearing a loose, shimmering dress that is dark and has a boat neck. The child's dress is light-colored and made of layers of a delicate organza-type fabric. The photograph was taken in the 1920s.
Over the past two years, with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)...

Whitman College writes: "As President and CEO of the American Foundation for the Blind, Kirk Adams '83 guides efforts to improve the lives of millions of blind and visually impaired people nationwide." “The American Foundation for the Blind is an organization I’ve been aware of all my life,” he said. “It has a unique place in the history of the blindness field. Helen Keller worked for AFB for 40 years. We have her archives. I can go sit at her desk, which is pretty cool. We’ve been at the forefront of understanding what the needs of blind people are and what the institutional, systemic barriers are in addressing them.” http://ow.ly/rikq30a0SEP (Photo: cover of WHITMAN MAGAZINE WINTER 2017, Kirk Adams on the subway platform, waiting for a train)
As President and CEO of the American Foundation for the Blind, Kirk Adams ’83 guides efforts to improve the lives of millions of blind and visually...

Remember, today only! Amazon will donate 5% (10 times the usual donation rate) of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to American Foundation for the Blind. Just use https://smile.amazon.com/ and enter "American Foundation for the Blind" as your charity of choice.