American Bookkeeping & Tax Service

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American Bookkeeping & Tax Service
American Bookkeeping & Tax Service is listed in the Tax Return Preparation & Filing category in Albany, Oregon. Displayed below is the only current social network for American Bookkeeping & Tax Service which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of American Bookkeeping & Tax Service on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 60.

Contact information for American Bookkeeping & Tax Service is:
430 2nd Ave SE
Albany, OR 97321
(541) 926-7982

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American Bookkeeping & Tax Service has an overall ZapScore of 60. This means that American Bookkeeping & Tax Service has a higher ZapScore than 60% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Albany, Oregon is 40 and in the Tax Return Preparation & Filing category is 38. Learn more about ZapScore.

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How to Get Tax Transcripts and Copies of Tax Returns from the IRS Taxpayers should keep copies of their tax returns for at least three years. Those who need a copy of their tax return should check with their software provider or tax preparer. Prior year tax returns are available from IRS for a fee. For those that need tax transcripts, however, IRS can help. Transcripts are free. Tax Transcripts A transcript summarizes return information and includes Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). They are available for the most current tax year after the IRS has processed the return. People can also get them for the past three years. When applying for home mortgages or college financial aid, transcripts are often necessary. Mortgage companies, however, normally arrange to get one for a homeowner or potential homeowner. For people applying for college financial aid, see IRS Offers Help to Students, Families to Get Tax Information for Student Financial Aid Applications on IRS.gov for the latest options. Taxpayers can get two types of transcripts from the IRS: • Tax Return Transcript. A tax return transcript shows most line items including AGI from an original tax return (Form 1040, 1040A or 1040EZ) as filed, along with any forms and schedules. It doesn’t show changes made after the filing of the original return. This transcript is only available for the current tax year and returns processed during the prior three years. A tax return transcript usually meets the needs of lending institutions offering mortgages and student loans. • Tax Account Transcript. A tax account transcript shows basic data such as return type, marital status, adjusted gross income, taxable income and all payment types. It also shows changes made after the filing of the original return. To get a transcript, people can: • Order online. Use the ‘Get Transcript’ tool available on IRS.gov. There is a link to it under the red TOOLS bar on the front page. Those who use it must authenticate their identity using the Secure Access process. • Order by phone. The number to call is 800-908-9946. • Order by mail. Complete and send either Form 4506-T or Form 4506T-EZ to the IRS to get one by mail. Use Form 4506-T to request other tax records: tax account transcript, record of account, wage and income and verification of non-filing. These forms are available on the Forms & Pubs page on IRS.gov Those who need an actual copy of a tax return can get one for the current tax year and as far back as six years. The fee per copy is $50. Complete and mail Form 4506 to request a copy of a tax return. Mail the request to the appropriate IRS office listed on the form. People who live in a federally declared disaster area can get a free copy. More disaster relief information is available on IRS.gov. Plan ahead. Delivery times for online and phone orders typically take five to 10 days from the time the IRS receives the request. You should allow 30 days to receive a transcript ordered by mail and 75 days for copies of your tax return. Avoid scams. The IRS will never initiate contact using social media or text message. First contact generally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out. Additional IRS Resources: • Topic 156 - Copy or Transcript of Your Tax Return – How to Get One • IRS Tax Map, Copy of Return

Check Withholding Now to Avoid Surprises at Tax Time The federal income tax is a pay-as-you-go system. Employers generally withhold tax from workers’ wages. Taxpayers also often have taxes withheld from certain other income including pensions, bonuses, commissions and gambling winnings. People who do not pay tax through withholding, like the self-employed, generally pay estimated tax. In addition, those who earn income such as dividends, interest, capital gains, rent and royalties are usually required to make estimated tax payments. Each year, because of life events like changes to household income or family size, some people get a larger refund than they expect while others find they owe more tax. To prevent a tax-time surprise, the IRS offers these tips: • New Job. When starting a new job, an employee must fill out a Form W-4, Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate. Employers use this form to calculate how much federal income tax to withhold from regular pay, bonuses, commissions and vacation allowances. The IRS Withholding Calculator tool on IRS.gov is easy for taxpayers to use to figure how much tax to withhold to avoid surprises. • Estimated Tax. People who have income not subject to withholding may need to pay estimated tax. Those expecting to owe $1,000 or more than taxes withheld from their wages may also need to make estimated tax payments to avoid penalties. The worksheet in Form 1040-ES, Estimated Tax for Individuals, helps to figure the tax. • Life Events. A change in marital status, the birth of a child or the purchase of a new home can change the amount of taxes a taxpayer owes. The Managing Your Taxes After a Life Event page on IRS.gov provides resources to explain the tax impact of these changes. In most cases, an employee can submit a new Form W–4 to their employer anytime. Avoid scams. The IRS will never initiate contact using social media or text message. First contact generally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out. Additional IRS Resources: • Publication 505, Tax Withholding and Estimated Tax • IRS Tax Map, Withholding of Tax • Topic 753, Form W-4 – Employee's Withholding Allowance Certificate IRS You Tube Videos: • IRS Withholding Calculator – English | Spanish | ASL Share this tip on social media -- #IRSTaxTip: Check Withholding Now to Avoid Surprises at #Tax Time. https://go.usa.gov/xRWWK

Reduce Certain Summertime Costs with the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit Many parents send their children to summer day camps while they work or look for work. The IRS urges those who do to save their paperwork for the Child and Dependent Care Tax Credit. Eligible taxpayers may be able claim it on their taxes in 2018 if they paid for day camp or for someone to care for a child, dependent or spouse during 2017. Here are a few key facts to know about this credit: 1. Qualifying Person. The care must have been for “qualifying persons.” A qualifying person can be a child under age 13. A qualifying person can also be a spouse or dependent who lived with the taxpayer for more than half the year and is physically or mentally incapable of self-care. 2. Work-Related Expenses. The care must have been necessary so the taxpayer could work or look for work. For those who are married, the care also must have been necessary so a spouse could work or look for work. This rule does not apply if the spouse was disabled or a full-time student. 3. Earned Income. The taxpayer -- and their spouse if married filing jointly -- must have earned income for the tax year. Special rules apply to a spouse who is a student or disabled. 4. Credit Percentage/Expense Limits. The credit is worth between 20 and 35 percent of allowable expenses. The percentage depends on the income amount. Allowable expenses are limited to $3,000 for care of one qualifying person. The limit is $6,000 if the taxpayer paid for the care of two or more. 5. Care Provider Information. The name, address and taxpayer identification number of the care provider must be included on the return. The childcare provider cannot be the taxpayer’s spouse, dependent or the child's parent. 6. IRS Interactive Tax Assistant tool. Use Am I Eligible to Claim the Child and Dependent Care Credit? tool on IRS.gov to help determine if eligible to claim the credit. 7. Dependent Care Benefits. Special rules apply for people who get dependent care benefits from their employer. See Form 2441, Child and Dependent Care Expenses, has more on these rules. File the form with a tax return. 8. Special Circumstances. Since every family is different, the IRS has a series of exceptions to the rules in the qualification process. These exceptions allow a greater number of families to take advantage of the credit. For more information, see IRS Publication 503, Child and Dependent Care Expenses. Even if the childcare provider is a sitter in the home, taxpayers may qualify for the credit. Taxpayers who pay someone to come to their home and care for their dependent or spouse may be a household employer. They may have to withhold and pay Social Security and Medicare tax and pay federal unemployment tax. Find more on that in IRS Publication 926, Household Employer's Tax Guide. Avoid scams. The IRS will never initiate contact using social media or text message. First contact generally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out. Additional IRS Resources: • Tax Topic 602 - Child and Dependent Care Credit • Filing Your Taxes • IRS Tax Map • Is My Child a Qualifying Child for the Child Tax Credit? IRS YouTube Videos: • Welcome to Free File – English

Tips on How to Handle an IRS Letter or Notice The IRS mails millions of letters every year to taxpayers for a variety of reasons. Keep the following suggestions in mind on how to best handle a letter or notice from the IRS: 1. Do not panic. Simply responding will take care of most IRS letters and notices. 2. Do not ignore the letter. Most IRS notices are about federal tax returns or tax accounts. Each notice deals with a specific issue and includes specific instructions on what to do. Read the letter carefully; some notices or letters require a response by a specific date. 3. Respond timely. A notice may likely be about changes to a taxpayer’s account, taxes owed or a payment request. Sometimes a notice may ask for more information about a specific issue or item on a tax return. A timely response could minimize additional interest and penalty charges. 4. If a notice indicates a changed or corrected tax return, review the information and compare it with your original return. If the taxpayer agrees, they should note the corrections on their copy of the tax return for their records. There is usually no need to reply to a notice unless specifically instructed to do so, or to make a payment. 5. Taxpayers must respond to a notice they do not agree with. They should mail a letter explaining why they disagree to the address on the contact stub at the bottom of the notice. Include information and documents for the IRS to consider and allow at least 30 days for a response. 6. There is no need to call the IRS or make an appointment at a taxpayer assistance center for most notices. If a call seems necessary, use the phone number in the upper right-hand corner of the notice. Be sure to have a copy of the related tax return and notice when calling. 7. Always keep copies of any notices received with tax records. 8. The IRS and its authorized private collection agency will send letters and notices by mail. The IRS will not demand payment a certain way, such as prepaid debit or credit card. Taxpayers have several payment options for taxes owed. For more on this topic, visit IRS.gov. Click on the link ‘Respond to a Notice’ at the bottom center of the home page. Also, see Publication 594, The IRS Collection Process. Get IRS.gov/forms-pubs at any time. To make a payment, visit IRS.gov/payments or use the IRS2Go app to make a payment with Direct Pay for free, or by debit or credit card through an approved payment processor for a fee. Avoid scams. The IRS will never initiate contact using social media or text message. First contact generally comes in the mail. Those wondering if they owe money to the IRS can view their tax account information on IRS.gov to find out. Additional IRS Resources: • Tax Topic 651 – Notices – What to Do • Tax Topic 652 — Notice of Underreported Income – CP-2000 • Tax Topic 653 – IRS Notices and Bills, Penalties, and Interest Charges • Tax Topic 654 — Understanding Your CP75 or CP75A Notice Request for Supporting Documentation • Understanding Your CP2000 Notice IRS YouTube Videos: • IRS2Go - English | Spanish | ASL • IRS Taxes-Three Easy Ways to Pay – English | Spanish | ASL • Owe Taxes But Can't Pay? – English | Spanish | ASL • Responding to Audit Letter Notice CP75: Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) – English | Spanish | ASL

IRS Cautions Taxpayers to Watch for Summertime Scams IRS YouTube Videos: Tax Scams: English | Spanish | ASL Private Collection of Overdue Taxes: English | Spanish IR-2017-112, June 26, 2017 WASHINGTON – The Internal Revenue Service today issued a warning that tax-related scams continue across the nation even though the tax filing season has ended for most taxpayers. People should remain on alert to new and emerging schemes involving the tax system that continue to claim victims. “We continue to urge people to watch out for new and evolving schemes this summer,” said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. “Many of these are variations of a theme, involving fictitious tax bills and demands to pay by purchasing and transferring information involving a gift card or iTunes card. Taxpayers can avoid these and other tricky financial scams by taking a few minutes to review the tell-tale signs of these schemes.” EFTPS Scam A new scam which is linked to the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS) has been reported nationwide. In this ruse, con artists call to demand immediate tax payment. The caller claims to be from the IRS and says that two certified letters mailed to the taxpayer were returned as undeliverable. The scammer then threatens arrest if a payment is not made immediately by a specific prepaid debit card. Victims are told that the debit card is linked to the EFTPS when, in reality, it is controlled entirely by the scammer. Victims are warned not to talk to their tax preparer, attorney or the local IRS office until after the payment is made. “Robo-call” Messages The IRS does not call and leave prerecorded, urgent messages asking for a call back. In this tactic, scammers tell victims that if they do not call back, a warrant will be issued for their arrest. Those who do respond are told they must make immediate payment either by a specific prepaid debit card or by wire transfer. Private Debt Collection Scams The IRS recently began sending letters to a relatively small group of taxpayers whose overdue federal tax accounts are being assigned to one of four private-sector collection agencies. Taxpayers should be on the lookout for scammers posing as private collection firms. The IRS-authorized firms will only be calling about a tax debt the person has had – and has been aware of – for years. The IRS would have previously contacted taxpayers about their tax debt. Scams Targeting People with Limited English Proficiency Taxpayers with limited English proficiency have been recent targets of phone scams and email phishing schemes that continue to occur across the country. Con artists often approach victims in their native language, threaten them with deportation, police arrest and license revocation among other things. They tell their victims they owe the IRS money and must pay it promptly through a preloaded debit card, gift card or wire transfer. They may also leave “urgent” callback requests through phone “robo-calls” or via a phishing email. Tell Tale Signs of a Scam: The IRS (and its authorized private collection agencies) will never: • Call to demand immediate payment using a specific payment method such as a prepaid debit card, gift card or wire transfer. The IRS does not use these methods for tax payments. The IRS will usually first mail a bill to any taxpayer who owes taxes. All tax payments should only be made payable to the U.S. Treasury and checks should never be made payable to third parties. 1. Threaten to immediately bring in local police or other law-enforcement groups to have the taxpayer arrested for not paying. 2. Demand that taxes be paid without giving the taxpayer the opportunity to question or appeal the amount owed. 3. Ask for credit or debit card numbers over the phone. For anyone who doesn’t owe taxes and has no reason to think they do: • Do not give out any information. Hang up immediately. 1. Contact the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration to report the call. Use their IRS Impersonation Scam Reporting web page. Alternatively, call 800-366-4484. 2. Report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Use the FTC Complaint Assistant on FTC.gov. Please add "IRS Telephone Scam" in the notes. For anyone who owes tax or thinks they do: • View tax account information online at IRS.gov to see the actual amount you owe. Then review payment options. 1. Call the number on the billing notice, or 2. Call the IRS at 800-829-1040. IRS workers can help How to Know It’s Really the IRS Calling or Knocking The IRS initiates most contacts through regular mail delivered by the United States Postal Service. However, there are special circumstances in which the IRS will call or come to a home or business, such as: • when a taxpayer has an overdue tax bill, 1. to secure a delinquent tax return or a delinquent employment tax payment, or, 2. to tour a business as part of an audit or during criminal investigations. Even then, taxpayers will generally first receive several letters (called “notices”) from the IRS in the mail. For more information, visit “How to know it’s really the IRS calling or knocking on your door” on IRS.gov.