Army Research Laboratory

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Army Research Laboratory
Army Research Laboratory is listed in the Laboratories Research & Development category in Hyattsville, Maryland. Displayed below is the only current social network for Army Research Laboratory which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Army Research Laboratory on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 70.

Contact information for Army Research Laboratory is:
2800 Powder Mill Rd
Hyattsville, MD 20783
(301) 394-2515
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Army Research Laboratory Contact Information:

  • 2800 Powder Mill Rd
    Hyattsville, MD 20783
  • Map
  • Phone: (301) 394-2515
Social Posts for Army Research Laboratory

U.S. Army Research Laboratory published a note.
National STEM week inspires students
By Tracie R. Dean, ARL Public Affairs ADELPHI, Md. -- Thirty seven of the next generation of scientists and engineers had the opportunity to tour the U.S. Army Research Laboratory during National STEM "Week at the Labs" March 2. Lab visits give students unprecedented opportunities to experience the wonders of science up close and connect with professionals who work in Department of Defense and STEM based careers. The week-long event is a White House initiative designed to inspire students to explore Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics by visiting the nation's federal labs and provide students a close look at what it's like to work in STEM related fields. The ARL Technology Transfer and Outreach Office hosted students from Northwestern High School and Baltimore Schools engaged ARL's scientists and engineers about current game-changing research. Thomas Mulkern, chief of the Technology Transfer and Outreach Office, put the lab-Soldier connection into perspective for the students. "The Army has its own research laboratory because the Army has unique requirements. Everything we do at ARL is done with the Soldier in mind and is basic research to support the Soldier's needs," he said. Mulkern used the cellphone as an example to make a real world connection on the importance of sensors, batteries and materials used by Soldiers every day. "Soldiers have portable electronics. After long use, those devices can be out of commission for an entire week if they are in the field with no place to plug their equipment in," Mulkern said. "It is our job here at ARL to figure out ways to get energy to the field, provide electricity to power the equipment. We develop better chemistry to make the batteries in the equipment last a week, a month, and even a year or make it so that it never has to be charged." Lab tours and STEM based curricula offered in schools are meant to engage students in STEM through hands on experiences. While these strategies remain among the best ways to spark interests and connect science to student's everyday life, STEM educators recognize there are additional strategies that can be used to increase access to STEM training, education and summer STEM internships for area students. Ariana Stowe, program manager for the Vivian Burey Marshall STEM Pilot Initiative located in Baltimore, Maryland, participated in the day's lab tours with her students. Stowe noted the importance of providing information about opportunities in STEM based programs. "So many of our students are not aware that ARL is only 45 minutes to an hour away from their Baltimore communities," Stowe said. "They wrongly assume the only places that exist are in those in the immediate area when in reality there is so much more. "A strategy that can be effective in disseminating information is to have out of school STEM events like lab visit and Gains in the Education of Mathematics and Science, or GEMS, more frequently in order to give students ongoing exposure. This will ensure that STEM programs stay in the narrative and that these opportunities exist for students outside the Baltimore area." The most important take away Stowe wishes her students to have from their visit to ARL is to see themselves in the role of the scientists, engineers and researchers they had the opportunity to engage with. "I'd like my students to see themselves in the white lab coat working in the clean room or doing biotechnology research," Stowe said. "One of the researchers we met today mentioned that she loved biology in high school and she just didn't stop. Students must understand if they keep pursuing the STEM interests they have now, there is a career waiting for them." Precious Durojaiye is a ninth-grade student who plans to study and pursue a career in Biomedical Science. Durojaiye spoke about her enthusiasm after touring the biotechnology lab and learning about the different types of bacteria researchers are developing to protect the environment. "It was great to learning how researchers are trying to create bacteria to help landfills decrease the existing bacteria and also the chemicals radiation coming from landfills," she said. "It was very interesting in regards to biomedical, environmental and helping the health of every citizen." National STEM "Week at the Labs" coincides with February's conclusion of Black History Month and the start of Women's History Month in March. The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, currently celebrating 25 years of excellence in Army science and technology, is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command. RELATED LINKS U.S. Army Materiel Command U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command U.S. Army Research Laboratory ARL on Facebook ARL on Twitter ARL TV

Did you know that researchers in ARL’s Translational Neuroscience Branch are working to improve the way in which humans interact with robotics so that human automation joint teams are more effective on the battlefield? The technology envisioned through this project would allow military systems to complete complex military missions in dynamic environments with the right balance of warfighter involvement. #ARL25 #neuroscience #neuroengineering #translationalneuroscience

U.S. Army Research Laboratory published a note.
Girl’s school visits home of early computer
By Joyce M. Conant, ARL Public Affairs ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. ---- The U.S. Army Research Laboratory's DOD Supercomputing Research Center hosted a visit for a group of 11th grade students from The Catholic High School of Baltimore on International Women's Day, March 8. The 19 young women are enrolled in the school's science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM program, and are required to take computer engineering and programming their junior year of high school. During their visit to ARL, students learned about the history of computing, toured the center's high performance computer rooms ---- where "Excaliber" ---- one of the Army's fastest supercomputers is hosted, learned about and observed what remains of the Electronic Numerical Integrator And Calculator, or ENIAC, and participated in hands-on demonstrations of some of the center's scientific visualization technologies. The ENIAC, completed in 1946, was the first electronic programmable computer built in the United States. The students observed visualization technologies such as a large Cinemassive visualization wall and a mixed reality system known as zSpace. They were introduced to high performance computing and learned how these resources can be used to solve the Army's challenging research problems. Amanda Trapani, the students' teacher and director of technology, believes STEM students should be exposed to the current usage of computing by visiting local organizations; such as, the ARL Supercomputer Center, to fully understand how computing affects large-scale business and government operations in the real world. She said the students were most engaged and excited about the virtual reality technologies presented in zSpace. Sixteen-year-old Saoirse Bodnar was fascinated by the technology. "It was absolutely amazing to see how advanced technology is today. I enjoyed the visualization aspect of supercomputing and how data can be projected into the world," Bodnar said. Dr. Raju Namburu, Chief of the Computational Sciences Division and Director of the ARL Supercomputing Center said computer science is the only STEM field where there are more job openings than there are students. "We want to excite our next generation about the computational sciences and how they can contribute to the future," Namburu said. "In the next ten years, there will be more than 1.5 million job openings in the computing sector. As part of our outreach program, we know how important it is to host visits for school/college age students." As part of the ARL STEM outreach program, the ARL Supercomputer Center is hosting a computer science program. During the two-week academic program, students will be introduced to supercomputing and novel architectures; applications and tools; basic principles of engineering algorithms, programming languages and techniques and scientific visualization technologies. Students can apply at http://www.usaeop.com/apg. Applications close on April 1, 2017. The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, currently celebrating 25 years of excellence in Army science and technology is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command.

Shown here are employees of the National Bureau of Standards in 1945. Harry Diamond Laboratories, one of eight Army laboratories merged to form the Army Research Laboratory in 1992, was a research facility of the Ordnance Development Division of the National Bureau of Standards. At the time, scientists and engineers worked to develop fuzes for non-rotating (fin-stabilized) munitions such as bombs, rockets and mortar shells. #ARL25 #ThrowbackThursday

U.S. Army Research Laboratory published a note.
Army laboratory shapes future research
By David McNally, ARL Public Affairs ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Maryland (March 23, 2017) — The U.S. Army Research Laboratory hosted its Program Formulation Meeting March 20th to 23rd at the Mallette Training Center at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, in hopes of building bridges with stakeholders and gathering feedback to influence the future of Army research. Acting ARL Director Dr. Philip Perconti briefed the nine Essential Research Areas that he said the laboratory must address to support the Army of 2050. The areas cover a broad spectrum of future technology challenges : Human Agent Teaming Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Cyber and Electromagnetic Technologies for Complex Environments Distributed and Cooperative Engagement in Contested Environments Tactical Unit Energy Independence Manipulating Physics of Failure for Robust Performance of Materials Science for Manufacturing at the Point of Need Accelerated Learning for a Ready and Responsive Force Discovery “I don’t think any of these topics should be a surprise to anyone really,” Perconti said. “When you think about the complexity of the future, this is where we need to start the conversation.” Perconti said the future of research depends on collaboration. “If we don’t come together as a community in the beginning to get after how we’re going to engineer complex systems, I think we’re missing it,” he said. “We have to break down the stovepipes that we as institutions have erected.” The annual meeting brings together Army engineers, researchers and scientists with military and civilian representatives from organizations like Program Executive Offices, the Training and Doctrine Command and various research, development and engineering centers. Maj. Gen. Cedric T. Wins, commanding general of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command told the gathering that Army Chief of Staff General Mark A. Milley has set the priorities for the future of the force as number one, readiness, number two readiness of the future force, and number three, taking care of the troops. “We have to be focused on what it is that the Army has set forward as the priority in material development…in development of future capabilities to give our Soldiers the technological advantage that they need in the event that they are called upon in war,” Wins said. The meeting brought together senior DOD and Army leaders. Dr. Thomas Russell is the Army’s chief scientist and the deputy assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology. “The mission of science and technology in the Army is to look at the current force as well as the future force,” Russell said. “There’s a balance here as far as how we place resources to meet existing challenges and how we focus on the future and the emerging opportunities that might be occurring so we can help the Army define its future force.” Perconti thanked the attendees for helping share future research. “This workshop is part of aligning and synchronizing perspectives,” Perconti said. “Your help in this is vitally important to really critique what we’re doing, what are plans are and where we’re going to go together in the future — hopefully — to address these essential research areas.” The U.S. Army Research Laboratory, currently celebrating 25 years of excellence in Army science and technology, is part of the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command, which has the mission to provide innovative research, development and engineering to produce capabilities that provide decisive overmatch to the Army against the complexities of the current and future operating environments in support of the joint warfighter and the nation. RDECOM is a major subordinate command of the U.S. Army Materiel Command. RELATED LINKS U.S. Army Materiel Command U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command U.S. Army Research Laboratory ARL on Facebook ARL on Twitter