Appalachian Bear Rescue

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Appalachian Bear Rescue
Appalachian Bear Rescue is listed in the Veterinary Clinics & Hospitals category in Townsend, Tennessee. Displayed below are the social networks for Appalachian Bear Rescue which include a Facebook page, a Twitter account and a YouTube channel. The activity and popularity of Appalachian Bear Rescue on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 99.

Contact information for Appalachian Bear Rescue is:
438 Lawson Rd
Townsend, TN 37882
(865) 448-0143

"Appalachian Bear Rescue" - Social Networks

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Appalachian Bear Rescue has an overall ZapScore of 99. This means that Appalachian Bear Rescue has a higher ZapScore than 99% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Townsend, Tennessee is 44 and in the category is 52. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Social Posts for Appalachian Bear Rescue

Appalachian Bear Rescue added 14 new photos to the album: ABR Update-June 27, 2017-Otto and Rollo in Wild Enclosure #3.
Yesterday was a big day for our little bears: the curators released Otto and Rollo to Wild Enclosure #3! Ken LaValley, ABR’s photographer of record, was on hand to capture the occasion for our files, and took photos of our other residents as well. Curator Janet prepared Wild Enclosure #3 to receive the cubs by scattering food in different areas; this is the way Otto and Rollo will be fed, so it’s important they get used to foraging for their food. At 10:30 AM, Curator Tom raised the gate to Wild Enclosure #3 and waited for the cubs to exit their Acclimation Pen. At 10:50 AM, Otto and Rollo emerged from the gate and began to investigate their new (temporary) home. Otto gets credited for being the first to plant his paws on their new turf. The cubs explored the area nearest the gate, then climbed up a tree. As far as we know, that’s where they spent the night. Today, they were down foraging just as we’d hoped. It’s important our little bears be outside in as natural an environment as we can provide. If cubs as young as Otto and Rollo spend too much time in a pen they can “forget” what grass feels like on their paws. Trees provide a natural stress relief for them and they get to choose if they want to keep company or not. Their lives are enriched and their minds stimulated by our tiny version of a great forest. To be well, they need to be out. As you know, Dani Bear is usually out and about, providing us with terrific photo opportunities. Well, she chose to spend yesterday hidden in the undergrowth, avoiding Ken’s photoshoot except for a single image. We’re familiar with the contrariness of bears. Curator Coy doesn’t share information from his GPS collar study, but he did tell us that our collared bears often hang out in relatively accessible areas right up to the day their collars are due to fall off. Then they high-tail it to the most remote sections of the park and leave their collars where Coy has to hike for days to retrieve them. We know it’s all coincidence, yet we wonder… Contrary to Summitt’s normal behavior, he did appear for Ken, looking healthy and strong. To avoid upsetting Hawkins, Ken’s time and access were restricted, but we think he managed to capture the innate stateliness of our injured bear. We’ll post an update on our “Return to The Wild” campaign tomorrow, but as of June 21, 2017, the total donated was $5990.95! Thank you for helping us raise the $20,000 we need to cover food, medical costs and the final improvements to The Red Roof Recovery Center. Just click on the link and select “Return to The Wild Campaign” under “DESIGNATE THIS GIFT FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE”. https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link


ABR Update-June 26, 2017 We apologize for our late post; it's been a big day for a couple of little cubs. Otto... fb.me/69gzyU4NE

ABR Update-June 26, 2017 We apologize for our late post; it's been a big day for a couple of little cubs. Otto and Rollo were released to Wild Enclosure #3 early this afternoon. All went well except for our technology; we've had wifi and camera problems all day. For your edification (and to stall for time while we fix what's wrong with our tech) we offer the ever delightful Dani Bear sitting in her tree. We thank you for your patience and we hope to have photos of Otto and Rollo's big day tomorrow. Thank you for your support...even when things breakdown. ❤️ https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Appalachian Bear Rescue added 15 new photos to the album: ABR Update-June 25, 2017-Bears don’t like us.
Otto and Rollo, our five-month-old orphaned black bear cubs, have adapted quickly to their new Acclimation Pen. A number of friends wondered how the curators captured the cubs for transport and why they had to move them at all: wasn't the plan to release them to the Wild Enclosure adjoining their old acclimation pen? Yes, that was the plan, but like so many plans in bear rescue, it had to be modified. The electrical wires that run along the interior perimeter of Wild Enclosure #2 (the original choice for the cubs) are spaced slightly higher apart than the wires in Wild Enclosure #3. Rollo has gained weight, but not enough height to satisfy the curator that he wouldn’t be harmed by getting between (and perhaps caught in) the wires. Wild Enclosure #3 is better suited to smallish cubs like Rollo, and as much as the curators hate handling the bears, they decided it was for the best. We don’t sedate bears unless necessary. Since the cubs are still small and confined to a pen, Curators Coy and Janet caught them with a catch-pole, similar to those used by animal control workers. They worked quickly to transfer the cub to a carrier, then weighed it, subtracting the weight of the carrier to get the weight of the cub. This was a bonus for the curators; had they proceeded with the original plan, the cubs would have left their pen through a raised gate without being weighed. As you know, Otto weighs 20.4 pounds and Rollo weighs 15 pounds. If the cubs didn’t like the curators before, they really don’t like them now. Little bears may look cuddly and cute, but when captured they exhibit the Wolverine/Tasmanian Devil ancestry we’re sure is somewhere in their DNA. They’ve recovered from their ordeal (cubs and curators) and are ready for the next step on their road back to the wild (cubs, not curators). After the chaos of cubs, it was a relief to see Dani and Summit taking their naps in a tree. Dani woke up briefly to stretch (she’s has quite a set of legs!), but Summitt didn’t bother, his dislike for the curator exhibited as indifference. Hawkins reminded Janet he shares the cubs’ opinion of humans in general and curators in particular; he gave her enough huffs and swats to get his message across, loud and clear. Good, Hawkins! As of June 21, 2017, the total donated to our “Return to The Wild” campaign is up to $5990.95! Thank you for helping us raise the $20,000 we need to cover food, medical costs and the final improvements to The Red Roof Recovery Center. Just click on the link and select “Return to The Wild Campaign” under “DESIGNATE THIS GIFT FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE”. https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Appalachian Bear Rescue added 10 new photos to the album: ABR Update-June 24, 2017-Otto and Rollo move house.
Otto and Rollo moved to Acclimation Pen # 3 in anticipation of their release to Wild Enclosure #3 early next week. Curators Coy and Janet took the opportunity to weigh the cubs: Otto weighs 20.4 pounds and Rollo weighs 15 pounds.The bears raised the kind of ruckus we expect and want from wild bears, but the curators were quick, and the cubs were soon in their new pen. Otto has been in it before; you may remember he transitioned from The Cub House to this pen, then back to The Cub House when he stopped eating. This move was less traumatic; Otto is older and he has Rollo. The cubs scampered up to the platform, took advantage of the Cub Tub and found the Food Wheel. For those of you keeping up with the latest food trends at ABR, fashionable cubs now eat whole pears first, followed by whole plums. Berries, grapes and bear diet pellets are left for last. We had high winds overnight, and with yearlings in the Wild Enclosure, that made it a night of worry for Curator Janet. She was up at dawn to check on Summitt and Dani and found them sharing a branch, looking well. (We’ll pause here for a communal sigh of relief.) Bears are bears and bears will climb, whether we want them to or not. Hawkins continues his recovery. So far, he’s content to stay in the pen and we’re happy to let him. He’s eating well and resting; Curator Janet reports his scat is not as odiferous as it was yesterday and that’s saying a lot. As of June 21, 2017, the total donated to our “Return to The Wild” campaign is up to $5990.95! Thank you for helping us raise the $20,000 we need to cover food, medical costs and the final improvements to The Red Roof Recovery Center. Just click on the link and select “Return to The Wild Campaign” under “DESIGNATE THIS GIFT FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE”. https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link

Appalachian Bear Rescue added 8 new photos to the album: ABR Update-June 23, 2017-Rain!
It’s been raining, and there’s a lot more to come. Rain means nothing to our bears. It’s nature’s way of giving them a shower, something Hawkins could use. Confinement to a pen, even with a pool and twice-daily hosing, isn’t conducive to proper bear hygiene, at least from a human point of smell. To complicate matters, we don’t want him to move very much, so if Hawkins doesn’t mind, the curators will continue to hold their nose on approach. He’s doing well, eating what we offer, and excreting just as much, if not more. Hawkins is “poop-meister”! 😀 Dani and Summitt chose to occupy the same tree, this time with Dani on the lower branch. There are other trees they can use, so if the bears don’t want company, they can be alone. It leads us to believe the yearlings are together because they want to be. That makes us happy on two counts: 1. It’s better their relationship is friendly. 2: If they continue to hang out together, Summitt may be less likely to disappear into the undergrowth and will be easier to observe. At least, we hope he will. Otto and Rollo are doing well. Rollo tackled a pear half as big as his head and did a good job with it. Otto couldn’t help but want one too. Soon, the cubs will have to rely on solid, whole food as the major component of their diet. The curators are keeping an eye on the weather forecast, hoping for a stretch of sunny, warm days so the cubs can be released to a Wild Enclosure. As of June 21, 2017, the total donated to our “Return to The Wild” campaign is up to $5990.95! Thank you for helping us raise the $20,000 we need to cover food, medical costs and the final improvements to The Red Roof Recovery Center. Just click on the link and select “Return to The Wild Campaign” under “DESIGNATE THIS GIFT FOR A SPECIFIC PURPOSE”. https://salsa4.salsalabs.com/o/51586/donate_page/donate?track=Website_Donate_Page_Link


June 18, 2017 Jake Bear arrived at ABR on September 18, 2011, and was released back to the wild on December 19,... fb.me/8LvBdLDQZ


ABR Update-June 13, 2017-A question answered Sandra Berg asked a question, echoed by Jeannie Meyer, about... fb.me/6jD1gpru9


ABR Video Update-June 10, 2017-Our Return to The Wild Campaign Begins! We’re using this video to launch our 2017.. fb.me/13r7waNg5


ABR Update-June 8, 2017 Hawkins Bear is maintaining his own. Considering what he’s been through, that’s fb.me/6W4lJdMn4