Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch

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Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch
Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch is listed in the Veterinary Clinics & Hospitals category in Cave Creek, Arizona. Displayed below is the only current social network for Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 64.

Contact information for Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch is:
29605 N Cave Creek Rd
Cave Creek, AZ 85331
(480) 515-5448

"Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch" - Social Networks

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Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch has an overall ZapScore of 64. This means that Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch has a higher ZapScore than 64% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Cave Creek, Arizona is 43 and in the Veterinary Clinics & Hospitals category is 51. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch Contact Information:

Social Posts for Animal Hospital At Tatum Ranch

Looking for something fun to do this weekend? It's a bit of a trek but a fun event.
14 October, 9:00 AM - 50 E Civic Center Dr, Gilbert, AZ 85296-3463, United States - - - Join us for our 18th Annual BARKtoberfest - a huge celebration of all things DOG! Voted one of Gilbert's Best Events by...

Do you dress your pet up for Halloween?
Click here to view this item from PressofAtlanticCity.com.

Animal Hospital at Tatum Ranch shared American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA)'s photo.
Finally, we're enjoying some cool mornings to walk those dogs!
Get those paws moving! Show off where you catch exercise together 💚

Animal Hospital at Tatum Ranch shared American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)'s post.
How cool is that? A therapy cat!!
Xeli is the newest addition to the Denver International Airport's team of therapy animals. Be sure to say hello next time you fly through Denver. (Perhaps when you attend the 2018 AVMA Convention next summer?) :)
Xeli, a 12-pound domestic shorthair cat, is the newest member of DIA’s ‘Canine Airport Therapy Squad’ (CATS).

Animal Hospital at Tatum Ranch shared International Veterinary Acupuncture Society - IVAS's post.
We've known some really special dogs that happen to be deaf. We'd love for you to tell us about your deaf dog!
Deaf Dog Awareness Week Deaf Dog Awareness Week is the last full week of every September. The main difference between deaf dogs and dogs that can hear, is how you communicate with them. Because they can’t hear, deaf dogs are reliant on visual cues, and this is where hand signals come in. Positive reinforcement is the way to go when teaching your deaf pup new command signals. Make sure you reward your dog handsomely when training – it’s amazing how fast they’ll catch on when motivated by hot dogs or some other tasty morsels. It’s important to have updated pet ID tags with your current phone number that identifies your dog as deaf. Deaf dogs can’t hear oncoming traffic, and they may be extra skittish if they get out and get separated from their owner. If someone finds your lost pet, personalized pet tags can provide crucial information about the animal. They will know they’re deaf, and keep them safe until you can be reunited. It’s important to keep your deaf pooch on a leash when you’re out and about. The last thing you want is for them to break away, say, after a squirrel on a trail, and then not be able to call them back. There are vibrating dog collars on the market for deaf dogs that send a signal to alert the dog to their owner, although with positive reinforcement and treat training your deaf pooch will learn to look at you and “check in” at intervals. Introduce gentle touch early to get your pup’s attention, when signal training, or to wake them gently. If you take your dog to a dog park or other places for socializing, you can touch your dog when another dog approaches from behind and point out the other dog so that he or she isn’t startled by a surprise visitor. For more resources on training your deaf dog, and to be connected to a community of people who own dogs that are deaf, check out Deaf Dogs Rock http://deafdogsrock.com/.