Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program

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Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program is listed in the Alcoholism Information & Treatment Centers category in Belmont, Massachusetts. Displayed below are the social networks for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program which include a Facebook page, a Linkedin company page, a Twitter account and a YouTube channel. The activity and popularity of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 97.

Contact information for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program is:
115 Mill St
Belmont, MA 02478
(617) 855-2781

"Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program" - Social Networks

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Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program has an overall ZapScore of 97. This means that Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program has a higher ZapScore than 97% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Belmont, Massachusetts is 30 and in the category is 34. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Social Posts for Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment Program

A recent study suggests that people who go to bed late have less control over their OCD symptoms.
Researchers from Binghamton University in New York found sleep timing, rather than the total amount of shut eye, may influence our body clock and...


A recent study suggests that people who go to bed late have less control over their OCD symptoms. #OCDsymptoms ow.ly/vNCA30cMz5i


Thanks for the retweets this week @LuanneRice @shyduroff @gerry_dawson77 much appreciated! (Want this? It's FREE! commun.it/get-more-follo…


McLean's educational outreach program has brought interactive neuroscience lessons to Greater Boston students. ow.ly/690B30cMvyX

Have you ever held a human brain in your hands ... or ever imagined doing so? Thanks to McLean Hospital’s new educational outreach program, many students around Greater Boston have had the chance not only to hold an actual brain, but also to learn about the inner workings and boundless potential of the mind. Launched in March 2016, the program has brought interactive lessons on neuroscience to students at local schools, science fairs, and museums.
Have you ever held a human brain in your hands...or ever imagined doing so? Thanks to McLean Hospital’s new educational outreach program, many...

Congratulations to Deconstructing Stigma participant and New York Times Best Selling author Luanne Rice on the publication of The Beautiful Lost. Like so many of our friends, Luanne is using her powerful voice as a mental health advocate and decided to address teen depression in her latest book.
The Beautiful Lost by Luanne Rice What it’s about: Here are three things to know about Maia: 1. Ever since her mother left, Maia’s struggled with depression — which once got so bad, she…


Learn about the potential of McLean’s new Siemens Prisma 3T MRI scanner ow.ly/jI5Y30cMfML

Since its invention more than 40 years ago, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology has allowed clinicians and researchers to produce more precise images of the human body and gain a greater understanding of injuries and disease. For McLean’s Scott E. Lukas, PhD, and Diego A. Pizzagalli, PhD, recent improvements in MRI technology hold tremendous potential for the study of brain function, structure, and chemistry—particularly how the brain mediates addiction and mental illness.
Since its invention more than 40 years ago, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology has allowed clinicians and researchers to produce more...


Thanks for the retweets this week @BProllercoaster @HanBertrand much appreciated! ➡️Want thi commun.it/thank-you/?aid…

What are doctors doing to help address the lack of health care resources in rural areas? “Mental health conditions require consistent follow-up,” said Dr. Shelly F. Greenfield, chief academic officer at McLean Hospital. “Patients may need to see somebody weekly for some forms of treatment, and if in the acute phase, almost daily in some instances. You can see immediately the problem for rural residents. It’s not a new phenomenon. I think, however, that the escalated prevalence of opioid use disorders has shined a light on this disparity.”
In every week, weather permitting, Marna Schwartz ’00 hops into a small plane and travels from her home in Juneau, Alaska, to spend a few days...