Beckville Lutheran Church

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Beckville Lutheran Church
Beckville Lutheran Church is listed in the Churches category in Litchfield, Minnesota. Displayed below are the social networks for Beckville Lutheran Church which include a Facebook page, a Google Plus page, a Linkedin company page, a Pinterest page and a Twitter account. The activity and popularity of Beckville Lutheran Church on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 86.

Contact information for Beckville Lutheran Church is:
20521 600th Ave
Litchfield, MN 55355
(320) 693-2519

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Beckville Lutheran Church has an overall ZapScore of 86. This means that Beckville Lutheran Church has a higher ZapScore than 86% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Litchfield, Minnesota is 37 and in the Churches category is 42. Learn more about ZapScore.

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God Pause for Friday, November 17, 2017 It is not easy to manage an unexpected gift. Have you noticed that many who come into a windfall of cash tend to squander most, if not all of it. On the other hand, life experiences have taught me that most who acquire means over a longer time normally have the gift of being good stewards, yet even the best will blow it sometimes. The key for both groups is to be able to realize that what they have been allowed to use is a trust. For such people, ownership is a word rarely used. In a culture that is often driven by the desire to have it all, maybe Jesus' words can call us again to recognize the extravagant gifts of God. To recognize that we have received God's gifts as a trust, and that in Christ we can be drawn and empowered to lives lived simply and responsibly in the joyful use of God's gifts for the sake of our neighbor. All giving God, we rest in the assurance that you will not hold our selfishness against us. We pray we can overcome those urges and share freely with all in a common good. Amen. Rodger C. Prois, '93 Bishop, Western Iowa Synod, ELCA Matthew 25:14-30 (NRSV) 14 "For it is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; 15 to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. 16 The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. 17 In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. 18 But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master's money. 19 After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. 20 Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, "Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.' 21 His master said to him, "Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.' 22 And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, "Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.' 23 His master said to him, "Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.' 24 Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, "Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; 25 so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.' 26 But his master replied, "You wicked and lazy slave! You knew, did you, that I reap where I did not sow, and gather where I did not scatter? 27 Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received what was my own with interest. 28 So take the talent from him, and give it to the one with the ten talents. 29 For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. 30 As for this worthless slave, throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. This God Pause daily devotion is brought to you by the alumni of Luther Seminary. Scripture quotations are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


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God Pause for Thursday, November 16, 2017 Jesus' teaching in these parables in Matthew's gospel invite us to think about what life in the kingdom of God looks like as we wait for Jesus to come again. In this particular parable, Jesus focuses on being a good steward of the gifts God has given us. Life would be much easier if being a good steward were simpler. We could be confident that we knew or were able to avoid actions that lead to outer darkness and gnashing of teeth. However, if that were the case, then Jesus wouldn't have had to die. Jesus, in telling this parable, calls us to lives of responsible stewardship that is not close-fisted, but openly corresponds to the generosity of God's gifts. The faithful steward knows that God's generous ways are beyond human comprehension, and so seeks to use God's gifts in ways that give honor to this faithful and generous giver. Gracious God, your ways are not our ways, your heart is bigger and you forgive debts freely. Help us to understand and treat all of our neighbors with your justice. Amen. Rodger C. Prois, '93 Bishop, Western Iowa Synod, ELCA Matthew 25:14-30 (NRSV) 14 "For it is as if a man, going on a journey, summoned his slaves and entrusted his property to them; 15 to one he gave five talents, to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. 16 The one who had received the five talents went off at once and traded with them, and made five more talents. 17 In the same way, the one who had the two talents made two more talents. 18 But the one who had received the one talent went off and dug a hole in the ground and hid his master's money. 19 After a long time the master of those slaves came and settled accounts with them. 20 Then the one who had received the five talents came forward, bringing five more talents, saying, "Master, you handed over to me five talents; see, I have made five more talents.' 21 His master said to him, "Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.' 22 And the one with the two talents also came forward, saying, "Master, you handed over to me two talents; see, I have made two more talents.' 23 His master said to him, "Well done, good and trustworthy slave; you have been trustworthy in a few things, I will put you in charge of many things; enter into the joy of your master.' 24 Then the one who had received the one talent also came forward, saying, "Master, I knew that you were a harsh man, reaping where you did not sow, and gathering where you did not scatter seed; 25 so I was afraid, and I went and hid your talent in the ground. Here you have what is yours.' 26 But his master replied, "You wicked and lazy slave! You knew, did you, that I reap where I did not sow, and gather where I did not scatter? 27 Then you ought to have invested my money with the bankers, and on my return I would have received what was my own with interest. 28 So take the talent from him, and give it to the one with the ten talents. 29 For to all those who have, more will be given, and they will have an abundance; but from those who have nothing, even what they have will be taken away. 30 As for this worthless slave, throw him into the outer darkness, where there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth. This God Pause daily devotion is brought to you by the alumni of Luther Seminary. Scripture quotations are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.


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God Pause for Wednesday, November 15, 2017 Long before I studied Lutheran theology, or some of the stories from Luther's table talk, the "prophetic" dire predictions of impending doom upset me. They often had the character of fear tactics used by bullies to upset their hearers--and they were successful! John 9:4 reminds us to do the work we are given to do all day long and to live by faith, rather than in fear. In a similar way, Paul's letter to the Thessalonians seeks to calm their fears about what the future will bring. His words are filled with anticipation of Christ's return. Paul speaks of God's promise of salvation in Christ that fills us with joy, not fear. So too, we wait in active anticipation and tend to our neighbors' needs with joy in our hearts. Dearest Father, calm our souls and give us patience to wait while doing justice in your world. Amen. Rodger C. Prois, '93 Bishop, Western Iowa Synod, ELCA 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 (NRSV) 1 Now concerning the times and the seasons, brothers and sisters, you do not need to have anything written to you. 2 For you yourselves know very well that the day of the Lord will come like a thief in the night. 3 When they say, "There is peace and security," then sudden destruction will come upon them, as labor pains come upon a pregnant woman, and there will be no escape! 4 But you, beloved, are not in darkness, for that day to surprise you like a thief; 5 for you are all children of light and children of the day; we are not of the night or of darkness. 6 So then let us not fall asleep as others do, but let us keep awake and be sober; 7 for those who sleep sleep at night, and those who are drunk get drunk at night. 8 But since we belong to the day, let us be sober, and put on the breastplate of faith and love, and for a helmet the hope of salvation. 9 For God has destined us not for wrath but for obtaining salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ, 10 who died for us, so that whether we are awake or asleep we may live with him. 11 Therefore encourage one another and build up each other, as indeed you are doing. This God Pause daily devotion is brought to you by the alumni of Luther Seminary. Scripture quotations are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

God Pause for Tuesday, November 14, 2017 In the different communities that I am a part of, we can be obsessed with time. I recently listened to a lecture on the history of the wrist watch. The speaker provided some interesting new information, but then shared that even though he had many valuable watches, he was still often late. The Bible often speaks of God's time as Kairos, the time of opportunity and the promise of tomorrow, while the days and years in which we live is called Chronos. Chronos is a gift that orders and limits our days on the earth. The unfortunate reality is that we often let the gift of Chronos drive us without being open to the possibility that God's promising Kairos might be at play in our lives. The psalmist reminds us that God can teach us to count our days, to truly be cognizant of how we use them. Such knowledge belongs to wise hearts that are able to deal with whatever the day may bring. Oh God, we give you thanks for this day and the ability to spend it in service to you and our neighbor. We pray that you will help us to see the value of our time and help us to not squander it in fruitless pursuits or selfish desires. Amen. Rodger C. Prois, '93 Bishop, Western Iowa Synod, ELCA Psalm 90:1-12 (NRSV) 1 Lord, you have been our dwelling place in all generations. 2 Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever you had formed the earth and the world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God. 3 You turn us back to dust, and say, "Turn back, you mortals." 4 For a thousand years in your sight are like yesterday when it is past, or like a watch in the night. 5 You sweep them away; they are like a dream, like grass that is renewed in the morning; 6 in the morning it flourishes and is renewed; in the evening it fades and withers. 7 For we are consumed by your anger; by your wrath we are overwhelmed. 8 You have set our iniquities before you, our secret sins in the light of your countenance. 9 For all our days pass away under your wrath; our years come to an end like a sigh. 10 The days of our life are seventy years, or perhaps eighty, if we are strong; even then their span is only toil and trouble; they are soon gone, and we fly away. 11 Who considers the power of your anger? Your wrath is as great as the fear that is due you. 12 So teach us to count our days that we may gain a wise heart. This God Pause daily devotion is brought to you by the alumni of Luther Seminary. Scripture quotations are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible, copyright 1989, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.