Arlington Historical Society Museum

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Arlington Historical Society Museum
Arlington Historical Society Museum is listed in the Museums category in Arlington, Virginia. Displayed below is the only current social network for Arlington Historical Society Museum which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Arlington Historical Society Museum on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 87.

Contact information for Arlington Historical Society Museum is:
1805 S Arlington Ridge Rd
Arlington, VA 22202
(703) 892-4204

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Arlington Historical Society Museum has an overall ZapScore of 87. This means that Arlington Historical Society Museum has a higher ZapScore than 87% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Arlington, Virginia is 38 and in the category is 55. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Social Posts for Arlington Historical Society Museum

The Arlington Historical Museum is open today from 12:30-3:30 pm Free! Stop in today to see our new temporary exhibit on World War I. WWI changed the world and it changed Arlington. This exhibit is part of the county’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the U. S. entering the First World and will run through the summer. The exhibit will feature items from Arlingtonians who served in the war, some of which have not been in display in the museum for many years, if ever. The exhibit will also include items from the personal collection of Arlington Historical Museum Director Dr. Mark Benbow

On this day in Arlington history: June 28, 1909 Orville Wright returns to Fort Myer to finish his flight tests after his horrible crash in 1908 which killed Capt. Thomas Selfridge. This YouTube video includes footage from the 1909 Fort Myer flights.
The Wright Brothers flying at Fort Myer, France, and Italy in 1908-1909. Includes the first motion pictures ever taken from an airplane. Footage from 1938 Ar...

Arlington Historical Society added 3 new photos.
On this day in Arlington history, June 28, 1887: Arthur C. Morgan is born in Langley, Virginia. He will be one of 13 Arlington men killed in World War I and one of two African-Americans from Arlington to be killed. Arthur Morgan died on December 3, 1918, three weeks after the Armistice. Unfortunately there are few surviving records for Arthur. He was among the oldest of Arlington’s veterans killed in the Great War. Before he was drafted, he was married and living in Hall’s Hill. He worked at the Arlington Experimental Farm. (He may be pictured in this group photo of workers at the Arlington Experimental Farm taken in 1910. If you know which man he is, please contact AHS.) On his draft card (Page one is shown here) he described himself as being of medium build with black hair and black eyes and he admitted he was slightly balding. When Private Morgan was reinterred at Arlington National Cemetery on August 3, 1920. The cemetery’s “Report of Interment” form states that he was in Company A, 550th Engineer Service Battalion. When he died on December 3, 1918, he had first been buried with hundreds of other Americans in American Cemetery #153 in Lambezellec, Finistere, France. The U.S. armed forces were rigidly segregated during World War I. Still, many African Americans eagerly volunteered to join the Allied cause. By the Armistice with Germany on November 11, 1918, over 350,000 African Americans had served with the American Expeditionary Force on the Western Front. The U.S. Army General Staff believed that since most blacks had been manual laborers as civilians, they should be laborers in the Army so black service troops received little or no combat training. As a result, approximately 90% were relegated to support roles and did not see combat. Nevertheless, among the first American troops to arrive in France in July 1917, were African-American stevedores. They worked day and night bringing war materiel ashore at the docks of Brest, St. Nazaire, Bordeaux, and other French port cities to load and unload crucial supplies. Soon they became known as Services of Supply (S.O.S.) units and they provided the basis of military logistics system in Europe. The S.O.S. dug ditches, cleaned latrines, transported supplies, cleared debris, and buried rotting corpses. Their hard work earned official praise but did not warrant promotion or reassignment. Blacks were limited to ranks of corporal and below. When the war ended on November 11, 1918, most combat troops came home as soon as transportation could be arranged. Service troops, however, particularly blacks, remained to clean up the battlefields, tear down the unneeded fortifications, and dismantle military installations. It was backbreaking, dirty, dangerous work. We do not know how Private Morgan died on December 3. He may have been injured or he, like thousands of others, may have succumbed to the influenza that still raged among troops.

Arlington Historical Society added an event.
"Washington’s Capital Brewmaster: Christian Heurich" with author Mark Benbow Christian Heurich (1842–1945) was not only Washington D.C.’s most successful brewer, he was the world’s oldest, with 90 years’ experience. He walked across central Europe learning his craft, survived a shipboard cholera epidemic, recovered from malaria and worked as a roustabout on a Caribbean banana boat—all before age 30. Heurich lived most of his life in Washington, becoming its largest private landowner and opening the city’s largest brewery. He won a “beer war” against his rivals and his beers won medals at World’s Fairs. He was trapped in Europe while on vacation at the start of both World Wars, once sleeping through an air raid, and was accused of being a German spy plotting to assassinate Woodrow Wilson. . Drawing on family papers and photos, the author chronicles Heurich’s life and the evolving beer industry before and after Prohibition. Dr. Mark Benbow is an assistant professor of American History at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. This program is free and open to the public. Itr is being held at the REINSCH LIBRARY AUDITORIUM on the campus of Marymount University. It is part of a monthly series of public programs sponsored by the Arlington Historical Society and Marymount’s Department of History and Politics. DRIVING DIRECTIONS and FREE PARKING: Attendees should enter the Marymount University campus at the library gate on N. 26th Street. Then turn left and park in the garage at the bottom of the incline. Handicapped parking is just inside the gate at the library. For complete directions to the Main Campus of Marymount University go to http://www.marymount.edu/Home/Contact-us/Locate-us PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: A free Marymount Shuttle bus is available from the Ballston-MU Metro Station (Orange and Silver lines). The University is also accessible via Metro bus routes 23A and 23T; exit at the N. Glebe Road and Old Dominion Drive stop.
6 people interested

Arlington Historical Society added an event.
Learn what happened in Arlington as it struggled to more fully desegregate its schools by busing. Hear what it was like from a panel of black and white students, parents, and teachers. This program is free and open to the public. It will be held at the REINSCH LIBRARY AUDITORIUM on the Marymount University Campus. It is part of a monthly series of public programs sponsored by the Arlington Historical Society and Marymount’s Department of History and Politics. DRIVING DIRECTIONS and FREE PARKING: Attendees should enter the Marymount University campus at the library gate on N. 26th Street. Then turn left and park in the garage at the bottom . Handicapped parking is just inside the gate at the library. For complete directions to the Main Campus of Marymount University go to http://www.marymount.edu/Home/Contact-us/Locate-us PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION: A free Marymount Shuttle bus is available from the Ballston-MU Metro Station (Orange and Silver lines). The University is also accessible via Metro bus routes 23A and 23T; exit at the N. Glebe Road and Old Dominion Drive stop.
21 people interested