Annapolis Marine Art Gallery

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Annapolis Marine Art Gallery
Annapolis Marine Art Gallery is listed in the Picture Frame Dealers category in Annapolis, Maryland. Displayed below are the social networks for Annapolis Marine Art Gallery which include a Facebook page and a Twitter account. The activity and popularity of Annapolis Marine Art Gallery on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 87.

Contact information for Annapolis Marine Art Gallery is:
110 Dock St
Annapolis, MD 21401
(410) 263-4100

"Annapolis Marine Art Gallery" - Social Networks

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Annapolis Marine Art Gallery has an overall ZapScore of 87. This means that Annapolis Marine Art Gallery has a higher ZapScore than 87% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Annapolis, Maryland is 40 and in the Picture Frame Dealers category is 43. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Annapolis Marine Art Gallery Contact Information:

Social Posts for Annapolis Marine Art Gallery


early marine art . . . twitter.com/TheVisualArt/s…


RT @chesapeakebay: Wow! How cool! fox5dc.com/news/photos-ca…


#ThrowbackThursday Aubrey Bodine's Chesapeake Bay Work Boat Races 1931 https://t.co/0DtRehtAPm


TONIGHT! Ecological History of the Bay twitter.com/McNasbys/statu…


RT @AnnapolisPatch: Dog Friendly Annapolis Makes List Of Best Small Cities dlvr.it/QBfR50

Only Metal Sculptor Paul Lockhart can make a steel heron look like it is gliding through the air. "Flying Heron Circle" by Eastern Shore artist Paul Lockhart

At the centerpiece of the print wall . . . "Annapolis Ca. 1906"

Rob Dreyer's "Standoff" crab canvases are flying out of here, 12 x 24 and 18 x 36 earlier this week, 18 x 36 today.

Patrick O'Brien's "Battle of the Chesapeake" The Battle of the Chesapeake Bay was one of the decisive turning points in American history. The British navy’s loss of this battle allowed General George Washington to defeat the British at Yorktown, thereby ending the American Revolution. The battle took place just outside the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay on September 5, 1781, between a British fleet of 19 ships and a French fleet of 24 ships. For two and a half hours the fleets traded broadsides, sending thousands of cannonballs smashing into hulls, masts and sailors. Neither fleet was decisively defeated, but the French won the day by denying the British entrance into the Bay. This prevented the British from resupplying their troops. As a result, the British were forced to surrender to General Washington.

Nice variety out the back door: Geoff Hunt, Daven Anderson, Donald Stoltenberg