Astronomical Society of The Pacific

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Astronomical Society of The Pacific
Astronomical Society of The Pacific is listed in the Associations category in San Francisco, California. Displayed below are the social networks for Astronomical Society of The Pacific which include a Facebook page, a Twitter account and a YouTube channel. The activity and popularity of Astronomical Society of The Pacific on these social networks gives it a ZapScore of 99.

Contact information for Astronomical Society of The Pacific is:
390 Ashton Ave
San Francisco, CA 94112
(415) 337-1100
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Social Posts for Astronomical Society of The Pacific

Ever wonder how NASA technologies benefit your life? Here's a great NASA website highlighting over 2000 commercial products that are spin-offs of NASA technologies. https://spinoff.nasa.gov

Astronomical Society of the Pacific updated their cover photo.
Astronomical Society of the Pacific's cover photo

Something for St. Patrick's Day from the ASP. What glows green in space? Find out. http://www.universetoday.com/100455/what-glows-green-in-space/
While a quest for green beer in space would be difficult, we're happy to report there are other ways you can celebrate Saint Patrick's Day while looking at


The Sunspotter solar telescope is a beautiful & safe outreach tool, &great large solar observing groups! More info:†twitter.com/i/web/status/8…

One of our most popular Astroshop products is the Sunspotter solar telescope. This unusual looking "telescope" safely projects the Sun and is fantastic for groups that do lots of solar outreach. Find it on our Astroshop- and ASP members get 10% off! Check it out at the link below. ASP Staff member Dave Prosper adds, "The Sunspotter is one of the handiest astronomy outreach tools I have ever used. It is sturdy, striking in appearance, and perfect for use with small groups of all ages. It's simple to transport and set up - it even includes a built-in handle, and its own instructions are printed on the side. "Is it safe?" That's the question always asked when you are observing the Sun, and the Sunspotter is hands down one of the safest solar "telescopes" out there."
The safer solar telescope. Solar viewing is a great activity for amateur astronomers and school kids. Now it is safe and practical. Observers or students in a small group can view and track sunspots across the Sun. A beautiful, fascinating and durable astronomical tool that everyone will enjoy. Ship...


RT @AlanStern: THIS is a cute (or scary?) take on which star system have seen which radio/TV leakages… https://t.co/j1Dw2f2LQd


RT @NightSkyPark: Flying to Oregon to film #eclipse2017 PSAs in Newport, Amity, and Madras. https://t.co/ei6hOJ1eZW


Find out how the first tools for detecting exoplanets were created in the latest Astronomy Beat! astrosociety.org/publications/a…

This month’s Astronomy Beat takes us back to the very early days of exoplanet discovery, before the days of space telescopes when astronomers used spectroscopy to capture the exceedingly tiny Doppler shifts of a star being tugged back and forth by its companion planet. How was this feat accomplished? What tools were built to make this possible? Dr. David Erskine tells us his behind-the-scenes story of how he invented tools and techniques helping early exoplanet detection. Members of the ASP can log in to view this edition at the link below!
Astronomy Beat is a monthly, on-line column written by “insiders” from the worlds of astronomy research and outreach.


Check out these fun teaching materials behind the "Pi in the Sky" challenge from NASA! jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/acti…