Alaska Volunteer Fire Department

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Alaska Volunteer Fire Department
Alaska Volunteer Fire Department is listed in the Fire Protection Services category in Puposky, Minnesota. Displayed below is the only current social network for Alaska Volunteer Fire Department which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Alaska Volunteer Fire Department on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 67.

Contact information for Alaska Volunteer Fire Department is:
4897 Mud Lake Rd NW
Puposky, MN 56667
(218) 243-2175

"Alaska Volunteer Fire Department" - Social Networks

Click to visit the social networks of Alaska Volunteer Fire Department:
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Alaska Volunteer Fire Department has an overall ZapScore of 67. This means that Alaska Volunteer Fire Department has a higher ZapScore than 67% of all businesses on Zappenin. For reference, the median ZapScore for a business in Puposky, Minnesota is 30 and in the Fire Protection Services category is 35. Learn more about ZapScore.

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Alaska Volunteer Fire Department Contact Information:

Social Posts for Alaska Volunteer Fire Department

Alaska Volunteer Fire Department shared Bemidji Police Department's post.
Don't be fooled.
********SCAM ALERT!!!!*************** A concerned citizen reported she received a suspicious letter in the mail from the American Federation of Police and Concerned Citizens (referred to as AFPCC) seeking a donation. It was reported that "Special Beltrami County Notice" was printed on the letterhead. (SEE ATTACHED PHOTOS) It was determined by Law Enforcement that online search records indicate the AFPCC is a legally recognized charity, however, it receives very poor ratings from charity oversight organizations. The AFPCC also has no affiliation with Beltrami County. Internet search records indicate several law enforcement agencies across the United States have issued warnings to citizens regarding solicitations from the AFPCC and a multitude of scam reports have been filed with numerous organizations.

Alaska Volunteer Fire Department shared Beltrami County Emergency Management's post.
BAD ROADS... USE CAUTION... PLEASE SHARE... We have had an unusually high number of crashes today, especially on Highway 2. With the sun shining on the pavement and the snow blowing on and across it, it is immediately turning into glare ice. Our 911 center is receiving lots of complaints on poor road conditions, crews are trying to treat them. With the cold temps and winds, any treatment is blowing off before they are effective. Please slow down and use caution, please share with your contacts so they have a heads up.


Alaska Volunteer Fire Department shared Beltrami County Emergency Management's post.
Drive safe, please.
REDUCED VISIBILITIES... Even in the forested areas of Minnesota we can see brief white out conditions, especially near our big lakes. These MNDOT cameras provide a glimpse what conditions are like up near Waskish and Shooks. Obviously gusty winds off Upper Red Lake are causing some reduced visibility with blowing and drifting snow... not as bad in the metro area of Shooks this morning Remember to drive with caution, headlights on and slow down!

Alaska Volunteer Fire Department shared Bemidji Police Department's post.
Slow down!
MnDOT urges motorists to be cautious when driving near snowplows ST. PAUL, Minn. – There have been at least 22 crashes so far this season involving vehicles and snowplows. With significant snow totals forecast for much of the state this week, the Minnesota Department of Transportation is urging motorists to use extra caution during plowing and snow removal operations. “Inattentive drivers, motorists driving too close to the plow and motorists driving too fast for conditions are the main causes of these crashes,” said Steve Lund, state maintenance engineer. “Our snowplow drivers are well trained to drive their plows, but motorists should be patient and stay back from the plow. Snowplows travel much slower than the posted speeds because it is most effective for clearing roads.” Lund said that operators’ ability to see behind them is restricted behind the truck so they must rely on mirrors to see to the rear and side of the truck. “Their vision is also hampered by the snow clouds created while they plow. So, the safest place you can be is well behind the snowplow and away from the snow cloud it creates,” he said. Last year in Minnesota, there were 58 crashes involving vehicles and snowplows. Minnesota law requires motorists to turn on their headlights when it’s snowing or at any other time when weather conditions impair visibility. Here are some other recommendations for safe driving around snowplows: • Stay alert for snowplows, which turn or exit frequently and often with little warning. They also may travel over centerlines or partially in traffic to further improve road conditions. • Stay back at least 10 car lengths behind the plow. Don’t drive into a snow cloud. • Slow down to a safe speed for current conditions. • Turn on your headlights and wear your seat belt. • Turn off the cruise control. • Be patient and remember snowplows are working to improve road conditions for your trip. • Don’t drive distracted. Motorists should check road conditions at 511mn.org.