Aintree Farm Stable

77


Aintree Farm Stable is listed in the Stables category in Germantown, Tennessee. Displayed below is the only current social network for Aintree Farm Stable which at this time includes a Facebook page. The activity and popularity of Aintree Farm Stable on this social network gives it a ZapScore of 77.

Contact information for Aintree Farm Stable is:
8999 Claiborne Farm Dr
Germantown, TN 38138
(901) 748-0025
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Aintree Farm Stable Contact Information:

Social Posts for Aintree Farm Stable

Spring Mill Farm shared their photo.
We thought this was a beautifully written post by our friend Amy Ford Brumfield, so we thought we would share with everyone on our page: After another long hiatus from riding (again) I put my left foot in the stirrup and lifted my right over the back of a horse. As soon as I settled in the tack I felt myself exhale a long, stress-filled breath of air. Due to a minor injury, I rode a borrowed horse. Where my own horse is long-necked, long-backed, and long-legged this equine was just the opposite. My horse stands patiently for my second foot to be placed securely in it’s stirrup. This one did a complete 180 before I got my leg over him. He was a very different type of ride than my horse, but in spite of those differences, he possessed the same heart and the same willingness to take flight when asked. He had the same desire to please when asked to lengthen his stride to make the designated three canter strides from one jump to the next; the same ability to compress his body to make a deep point of take-off work out beautifully. The horse is a noble and proud creature. They are big and strong and quick enough to hurt you, but they possess within themselves a gentle meekness and courage that never ceases to amaze and delight me. Winston S. Churchill once said, “The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man.” In my discipline of riding over fences, 98% of riders are female. Perhaps if more men rode, the world would be a different place-a better place. The love of horses pulses through my blood and has from the very beginning. It is as intrinsic to my DNA as my green eyes and brown hair. It is not just a preference or a hobby, but a need. A need as real and vital as food and water. It is a compulsion that, at times, I’ve felt guilt over due to the expense of time as well as money. I’ve finally come to terms with this struggle by accepting the fact that the feeling of a horses' breath on my cheek, of hearing the first nicker when entering the barn, of just being in a horses' presence is no different than the need to breathe. It is part of who I am; part of who God created me to be. He uses many different ways of teaching us, and even healing us, and He has used my connection to horses in a way that reaches the deepest crevasses of my soul. The 1924 Olympic runner, and future missionary to China, Eric Liddel was rebuked by his sister when she said that his time would be better spent in full-time ministry than spending hours running circles on the track in preparation for competition. His response to her was, “I believe God made me for a purpose, but He also made me fast! When I run, I feel God’s pleasure.” I feel that same divine pleasure when I ride. I feel God smile. I have been blessed with a barn family that has accepted me into their ranks with great generosity of spirit and a selfless desire to support and encourage the evasive pursuit of a perfect “winning round.” In spite of the lack of consistency in my ability to ride and show with any regularity, the trainers at Spring Mill Farm, treat me no differently than the clients that lesson much more frequently and attend the very full calendar of shows. I am so grateful. As I left the barn this afternoon, I did so with a completely different perspective than when I arrived. I left with gratitude, thankfulness, and shoulders squared to meet the unpredictability of life. I left with a contentment that wasn’t there before, and a sense that, in some small measure, the world had “righted” itself once more.

We thought this was a beautifully written post by our friend Amy Ford Brumfield, so we thought we would share with everyone on our page: After another long hiatus from riding (again) I put my left foot in the stirrup and lifted my right over the back of a horse. As soon as I settled in the tack I felt myself exhale a long, stress-filled breath of air. Due to a minor injury, I rode a borrowed horse. Where my own horse is long-necked, long-backed, and long-legged this equine was just the opposite. My horse stands patiently for my second foot to be placed securely in it’s stirrup. This one did a complete 180 before I got my leg over him. He was a very different type of ride than my horse, but in spite of those differences, he possessed the same heart and the same willingness to take flight when asked. He had the same desire to please when asked to lengthen his stride to make the designated three canter strides from one jump to the next; the same ability to compress his body to make a deep point of take-off work out beautifully. The horse is a noble and proud creature. They are big and strong and quick enough to hurt you, but they possess within themselves a gentle meekness and courage that never ceases to amaze and delight me. Winston S. Churchill once said, “The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a man.” In my discipline of riding over fences, 98% of riders are female. Perhaps if more men rode, the world would be a different place-a better place. The love of horses pulses through my blood and has from the very beginning. It is as intrinsic to my DNA as my green eyes and brown hair. It is not just a preference or a hobby, but a need. A need as real and vital as food and water. It is a compulsion that, at times, I’ve felt guilt over due to the expense of time as well as money. I’ve finally come to terms with this struggle by accepting the fact that the feeling of a horses' breath on my cheek, of hearing the first nicker when entering the barn, of just being in a horses' presence is no different than the need to breathe. It is part of who I am; part of who God created me to be. He uses many different ways of teaching us, and even healing us, and He has used my connection to horses in a way that reaches the deepest crevasses of my soul. The 1924 Olympic runner, and future missionary to China, Eric Liddel was rebuked by his sister when she said that his time would be better spent in full-time ministry than spending hours running circles on the track in preparation for competition. His response to her was, “I believe God made me for a purpose, but He also made me fast! When I run, I feel God’s pleasure.” I feel that same divine pleasure when I ride. I feel God smile. I have been blessed with a barn family that has accepted me into their ranks with great generosity of spirit and a selfless desire to support and encourage the evasive pursuit of a perfect “winning round.” In spite of the lack of consistency in my ability to ride and show with any regularity, the trainers at Spring Mill Farm, treat me no differently than the clients that lesson much more frequently and attend the very full calendar of shows. I am so grateful. As I left the barn this afternoon, I did so with a completely different perspective than when I arrived. I left with gratitude, thankfulness, and shoulders squared to meet the unpredictability of life. I left with a contentment that wasn’t there before, and a sense that, in some small measure, the world had “righted” itself once more.

Spring Mill Farm added 2 new photos.
Springmill's Lower lounge "back in the day wall of fame" portraits of our trainers!!

Spring Mill Farm with Marina Trejo Yukon and Olivia Yukon.
Congratulations to Olivia Yukon and LEVONWORTH on their 2016 USHJA Zone 4 JrHunter 3'3" Reserve Champion Horse Of The Year Award!!! We are so proud of this teams hard work and dedication!!

Spring Mill Farm added 2 new photos.
Riding trails at Springmill